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What would you say to a prospect who questions why your app is written in Synergy?

By William Mooney, Posted on September 20, 2012 at 5:38 pm

Recently the technology director for one of our top customers forwarded to me a copy of a lengthy email he had sent to the employees at his company, just raving about the new features available in the latest version of Synergy/DE. Apparently his sales director had responded to the email with great enthusiasm, but requested a condensed version of the email that he could forward out to decision makers and prospects. So my contact, the development manager, asked me if I could repeat something I had said during one of the evening events at the DevPartner Conference in May—something about how to respond to a prospect who questions why your app is written in Synergy. He thought what I had said represented a condensed version of his email, and was something that his sales director would be able to use. At first, I tried to remember exactly what it was that I said (bear in mind, I probably had a pint of Guinness under my belt at the time) but then quickly decided that there was an easy answer to this question—Guinness or no Guinness.

So, I provided the response below.

If asked, “What would you say to a prospect who questions why your app is written in Synergy?”, I would say…

Application X [the customer’s application] is developed with Synergy DBL, which is one of the most advanced languages in existence today for developing enterprise business applications. While Synergy/DE is a modern OO development suite that rivals any popular tool set today, what separates it from the pack is its portability. When we first developed Application X 30 years ago, we could never have possibly imagined that our customers would need to run on Windows 10 years ago or that there would be a .NET environment as we know it today. Because we use Synergy/DE, which over the years has consistently added support for the platforms we’ve needed to get to, and which currently compiles and runs on OpenVMS, all flavors of UNIX, Linux, Windows, .NET, handheld devices, and the Cloud, we at Company X can focus on functionality. There is no question there will be new user platforms down the road, but because Application X is based on Synergy/DE, we will be in a position to leverage our current business logic without the need for rewrites, no matter what shape a new platform happens to take. For “future proofing” an application, there’s no better place to be.

Cheers!

 


Welcome Back, DBL

By William Mooney, Posted on September 12, 2012 at 12:17 pm

OK, we were wrong… and many of you were right! Back before the turn of the century, we went through some re-branding efforts of our development tools—and renaming “Synergy DBL” to “Synergy Language” was one of the biggies. Ever since then, we’ve been trying to correct both customers and employees whenever they reference “DBL”. The primary reasons for making the change were 1) to move away from something associated with a “3GL,” and 2) to create a simpler, more descriptive name. The challenge here was twofold: first, going from “DBL” to “Language” really wasn’t that exciting in the first place. And, second, no matter what we changed the name to, you and our employees would always and forever call it DBL–because that’s the name that’s embedded in decades of code. DBL is the name of our compiler, after all, and the extension of our source files.  So, as our portable, advanced, object-oriented Synergy products have stood the test of time and have soared to even greater heights while other development tools have come and gone (4GLs, RAD-Rapid Application Development, etc.), we are now returning to, and embracing, the name that was there at the beginning—and always has been there—welcome back, Synergy DBL!


Live from Bell Harbor

By Roger Andrews, Posted on at 11:43 am

Today I’m excited to be blogging from the TV studio at the Bell Harbor Convention Center in Seattle for the live Visual Studio 2012 launch.

Since the Build conference last September, Synergex has been working closely with the Microsoft development teams ensuring that Synergy/DE works seamlessly with all the new exciting Microsoft technologies being released this fall–Visual Studio 2012, Windows 8, and Synergy for Windows Store applications on both ARM and Intel processors. Our team has made several visits up to Redmond to work directly with Microsoft engineers to enhance Visual Studio, Windows 8, and Synergy/DE.

You can download 10.0.3 of Synergy/DE today to start using the latest Visual Studio 2012 features, including the new async and await functionality demonstrated by Microsoft at the visual studio launch event.

I’m also incredibly pleased to talk about our new KitaroDB NoSQL database for Windows Store applications that we are releasing today. Built on our solid, high performance Synergy DBMS product, KitaroDB is the first on disk NoSQL database in the Windows 8 sandbox working with X86, X64 and ARM processors.

We have a Netflix sample application that uses KitaroDB, and in the next few weeks will be launching a great new Windows Store application that takes advantage of KitaroDB for its local persistent storage.

See www.kitarodb.com for more details.

 


Symphony Framework and CodeGen Helping Customers Migrate to a WPF UI

By Steve Ives, Posted on August 1, 2012 at 4:20 pm

Richard Morris and I have just returned from a seven-day consulting engagement with a customer, and I wanted to share with you some information about our achievements during the visit. The customer we visited with is one of our larger ISV’s and has an extensive Synergy application, much of which is implemented using the Synergy/DE UI Toolkit. As with many applications, life started out on cell-based systems many years ago, but for many years now it has been deployed exclusively on Windows systems.

SymphonyLogoThe customer in question had listened to us talking about Symphony Framework and CodeGen at the Chicago DevPartner conference, and was interested in how they might be able to leverage them to accelerate the process of updating the look and feel of their applications by replacing their existing UI Toolkit user interface with a Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) user interface. Needless to say we were eager to help, because we believe we have a great story to tell, and some great tools to share!

Most in the industry would agree that WPF represents the current “state of the art” when it comes to implementing user interfaces for Windows Desktop applications. We have had our eyes on WPF for some time now, and have been learning about it’s capabilities. We have also been encouraging customers to consider WPF as a great way of updating the UI of their existing applications, or implementing the UI of new applications. And thanks to new features in Synergy/DE 9.3 and 9.5 there are a couple of great ways of doing just that.

For existing applications the Synergy/DE .NET Assembly API can be used to embed WPF directly into existing applications. Of course one of the main benefits of doing so is that the application can be enhanced screen-by-screen, without the need for extensive re-writes and long development cycles. Of course for new development Synergy .NET can be used to build all-new applications with a WPF user interface. There is also a realistic migration path between the two; you can chose to start off by enhancing screens in an existing application via the .NET Assembly API today, and then ultimately migrate the entire application to a native Synergy .NET solution. All very “doable”.

Before I get into the specifics of our tools and what was achieved, there is one more thing that I should mention. Just as most industry pundits would agree that WPF is the way to go for Windows Desktop applications, most would also tell you that there is a specific WAY that WPF applications should be implemented; it’s called the “Model-View-ViewModel Design Pattern”, which is often abbreviated as MVVM.

A design pattern describes a methodology for implementing a software solution to a certain problem. The MVVM design pattern sets out a way of designing software such that there are clear lines of demarcation between code that deals with different parts of an application. Specifically it prescribes how the “Model” (code which implements an applications data definitions and business logic) should be separated from the “View” (code which implements the applications user interface), and how these two entities should be joined by the “ViewModel”. We’ve talked quite extensively about MVVM in the past, and there are lots of great resources available on line, so I don’t intend to go into more detail here. Suffice it to say that adhering to the MVVM design pattern is strongly recommended when implementing WPF applications.

I mentioned earlier that we have been focusing on WPF for some time now, and also on MVVM. But as well as just learning about the technologies and patterns, Richard Morris has been “beavering away” at his home office in England pondering the question “how can we help our customers to easily use WPF and MVVM in the context of their existing Synergy applications?”. Once he’d finished pondering the question, he then started coding the answer … and the Symphony Framework was born.

So just what is the Symphony Framework and how can it help you? Well in a nutshell, Symphony Framework is an MVVM Framework (library) which can be leveraged by Synergy developers to significantly simplify the process of implementing WPF user interfaces in their Synergy applications, while at the same time adhering to the best practices prescribed by the MVVM design pattern. Symphony Framework can be used to incrementally add WPF UI to existing applications in conjunction with the .NET Assembly API, and it can be used to implement all-new Synergy .NET applications with a WPF UI.

Some areas of Symphony Framework are designed to specifically address the somewhat unique challenges associated with migrating UI Toolkit applications, but the framework is in no way limited to working only with UI Toolkit applications. To cut a long story short, if you have an existing Synergy application and want to “spiff it up” with a fabulous new WPF UI, then Symphony Framework might just become your new best friend!

I’m not going to go into a huge amount of detail about HOW this all takes place, but I do want to briefly describe some of the common steps. For the purpose of this illustration I’ll ask you to imagine an existing UI Toolkit application (but remember, it doesn’t have to be Toolkit), and imagine that I want to do a gradual screen-by screen migration to a WPF UI, initially driven by the existing application (via the .NET assembly API). What might the steps be? Well, for each screen (or window) we might:

  • Create a “Model” class that describes and exposes the underlying data to be worked with. Model classes inherit a lot of functionality from base classes in the Symphony Framework.
  • Create a “View” using WPF.
  • Create a “ViewModel” that exposes the information in the model to the view, and provides the functionality needed to service the requirements of the view. ViewModel classes also inherit a lot of functionality (in some cases all of the required functionality) from base classes in the Symphony framework.

The code for all of the steps described above would be implemented in Synergy .NET and would be compiled into a .NET assembly.

  • Use the .NET assembly APIs “GENNET” tool to create Traditional Synergy “wrapper” classes that allow these various components to be accessed and manipulated from the existing Traditional Synergy application.
  • Create a “Manager” class (we’re still trying to figure out what to call this bit!) which contains the bulk of the code required to instantiate and drive the underlying .NET code.
  • Modify the existing application to present the new WPF UI instead of the existing UI, primarily by accessing functionality exposed by the “Manager” class.

You might be tempted to see this last bullet point and think “there is is, modify our existing code, that’s the hard and time consuming part”! But don’t let this thought put you off, believe it or not the changes that typically need to be made to the existing code are relatively small and painless. This is due in no small part to the things that the Symphony Framework is doing for you!

During our visit with our customer we initially worked on what it would take to replace existing “lookup” routines with new WPF implementations. In a UI Toolkit application a lookup routine is often accessed via a “drill method” associated with an input field, and often uses a combination of input processing to allow the user to define search criteria, and list processing to present matching results. When the user picks an item the associated value is returned into the input field. We managed to get this process down to a fine art. and this is where CodeGen comes in.

CodeGen1We were able to create CodeGen templates which allowed us to generate most of the code that was required to “switch out” a UI Toolkit lookup for a WPF lookup. We were able to code generate 100% of the Model class, 100% of the View class, 100% of the ViewModel class, and 100% of the “Manager” class. All that remained was to modify the existing application to utilize the new code instead of the existing UI Toolkit UI. Figuring out how to do the first lookup probably took in the order of half a day, but with the process and CodeGen templates in place, the next four lookups probably took around 20 minutes each to implement. We left it at that, because we were confident that we had the process down at that point.

Then we moved on to other areas, attacking a “maintenance” type program. The process is actually remarkably similar, and actually not that much more complex, again because much of the base functionality required is inherited from the Symphony Framework. By the end of our engagement we pretty much had that process down also, and again much of the required new code was being code generated, leaving only relatively minor changes to the existing application to be made.

Of course not all aspects of an application are as simple to deal with as the scenarios that I just described, some parts of an application and its UI get pretty complex, and it isn’t always possible to code generate all of the required components, and it isn’t always possible for the Symphony Framework to provide all of the required functionality in the form of base classes. Programmers still have a role to play, and thank goodness for that! But I do believe that the tools that Richard and I have developed can play a significant role in projects of this type, and it’s not just theory, we just proved it!

Actually that’s probably not a totally fair statement for me to make, as there are several other customers who have already used the Symphony Framework with great effect. Just as there are many customers who already use CodeGen to generate many different types of code to address various application needs. But Richard and I don’t often get to work together on a project, and this is perhaps the first time that we have really tried to use both of these tools together and push them HARD to see what could be achieved. And I for one am confident that everyone involved, including our customer of course, was pretty impressed with the results.

By the way, if your goal is to build an all-new WPF application directly in Synergy .NET, while retaining and re-using large portions of your existing code, then the steps aren’t that different to those described above. The Models, Views, ViewModels and “Manager” classes would be essentially the same, but would be driven by a Synergy .NET WPF application rather than by a DBR application via the .NET Assembly API. We actually proved this recently while preparing a proof of concept demo for another customer. Having been provided with the code for a small sample application, and some sample data, we migrated the UI of the application to WPF using the steps described above. Once the application was working with a new UI, and armed with the classes that we had just created, we were able to re-purpose those classes without change in a 100% Synergy .NET WPF application. In all the process took about four hours … but probably could have been completed faster had we not been sat at a bar at the time! This really is pretty cool stuff!

Before finish I do want to stress one more time that the Symphony Framework and CodeGen tools are not just about UI Toolkit applications on Windows. Symphony Framework helps you migrate to an ultra-modern WPF UI on Windows, but the starting point could easily be an application that runs on a cell-based platform today. And CodeGen can be and is being used on all systems supported by Synergy.


Release Notifications for CodeGen and Symphony Framework

By Steve Ives, Posted on July 31, 2012 at 5:19 pm

At the DevPartner conference I told people that in order to receive notifications for new releases of the open source CodeGen and Symphony Framework projects they should “Follow” the projects on CodePlex.

It turns out that “following” a project doesn’t send release notifications. If you want to get release notifications then you must go to the “Downloads” page for each project and subscribe for notifications. If you are interested in either of these two projects then I would recommend that you do just that, as we’ve done some great enhancements to both recently, and there are more great things still in the pipeline.

The downloads page for CodeGen is at http://codegen.codeplex.com/releases and the downloads page for Symphony Framework is at http://symphonyframework.codeplex.com/releases.


Are you Ready for Windows 8 and Synergy 10?

By Steve Ives, Posted on at 4:49 pm

As discussed at the recent DevPartner Conferences, support for Synergy applications on Windows 8 will be introduced in Synergy 10, which is currently available as a beta release. Microsoft has announced the launch date for Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 will be October 26th, so it is reasonable to expect that the final versions of Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 will be available to developers via MSDN some time soon.

As well as introducing many new features and enhancements in Synergy .NET, Synergy 10 also includes some very significant new features on all of the Traditional Synergy platforms, particularly in the area of SDBMS (that’s ISAM to us mere mortals!). These changes are introduced in a new ISAM revision 6. It is important that you test your applications with Synergy 10 as soon as possible.

As soon as Windows 8 is available to your customers you are likely to start getting calls to install your applications on Windows 8, and that will REQUIRE you to install Synergy 10. At the very least, Synergex recommends that you install the Synergy 10 beta on a system (not necessarily Windows 8 ) and validate that your current application runs without errors. And if you don’t have s system to to that with, remember that it’s easy to build a Virtual Machine to use for testing.

Even better would be to rebuild your applications with version 10 and make sure you don’t have any issues there. And even better than that would be to do a little beta testing and try out some of the many cool new Synergy 10 features. There are even REWARDS for finding bugs!!!

You can find more information about Synergy 10 at http://www.synergyde.com/products/synergyde_beta.aspx


Beauty and the Beast

By , Posted on June 22, 2012 at 2:28 am

With every advancing version of Synergy/DE we are better armed to tame the beast!  For me one of the biggest beasts in a commercial application is a record lock.  This beast will appear without warning, leave no trace of its being, and always instils rage in the innocent users of the system who encounter it.

Although locking records is a fundamental requirement of any application it is always difficult to explain to a user who has been sat there for ten minutes with a “record locked” message flashing on the screen that “the system is functioning correctly”.  All they want to do is move forward and finish the task in hand.

So who has that rouge record locked?  Which line of code is actually causing the lock?  Is the lock valid?  How long has the lock been there?  If we could answer these questions then life would be so much easier.  So how can we tame the record lock beast?  With Synergy 9.5.3b of course!

If you attended the DevPartner conference in either Chicago or York then you would have seen my presentation “Hooked Line & Sinker”.  During the session I presented the new (and extremely cool) IO Hooks class that allows you to hook methods to the various events that occur around SDBMS data access.  For example you can register methods that are executed every time a record is read, stored, updated or deleted.  And given this capability I demonstrated the beautiful Synergy DBMS Lock Viewer.  By assigning my LockRecorder class to every file opened in update mode (a single line code change to my standard file open routine) I was able to record lock information in a central “lock manager” control file.  The Synergy DBMS Lock Viewer program I wrote then reads this file and displays lock information.

And the real beauty was just today.  Having modified a customer’s application to utilise the LockRecorder class I was able to run the Lock Viewer:

And immediately identify who was locking which records in which programs and how long the locks had been there.  It’s beautiful to just sit and watch the lock information appear and then clear – and when they don’t clear we call the culpritJ.  The usual response was “I just nipped out to get a cuppa”.  Maybe not the users fault, but now I know where to look in the program to see if I can prevent the lock being required.

If you are interested in the example code you can use the “Knock Knock Who’s Locked” tutorial which steps you through the whole process of creating the LockRecorder class and monitoring the lock manager control file.  The tutorial, along with all conference tutorials, can be downloaded from http://tutorials.synergex.com/.


Synergy .NET Without Purchasing Visual Studio

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 20, 2012 at 1:16 pm

It occurs to me that we may have forgotten to tell you about something important … sorry! Of course if you were at either of the recent Synergex DevPartner conferences then you will already know this, but if not then “listen up” because this could save you some money!

The development environment for Synergy .NET is provided by Microsoft Visual Studio. For Synergy 9 we support Visual Studio 2010 Professional or higher. If a developer wants to develop with Synergy .NET then they would install Synergy/DE and Visual Studio 2010, and then install “Synergy Language Integration for Visual Studio” (we call it SLI because it’s less of a mouthful) to add all of the Synergy .NET capabilities and templates alongside the other Microsoft languages like C# and Visual Basic. Many developers already have Visual Studio 2010 so this isn’t a problem … but what if you don’t?

Well … good news! In addition to purchasing Visual Studio 2010 there is also a free solution. It’s called Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Integrated) and you can download it directly from Microsoft. Basically the Integrated Shell is a bare bones version of Visual Studio, with all of the other languages stripped out. It’s not much use on its own, but if you install it and then install SLI … hey presto you have a full Synergy .NET development environment!

If you do decide to try this out then please remember that Synergy .NET requires Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1, so you’ll need to install that after installing Integrated Shell, but before installing SLI.

You can download the files that you’ll need from these locations:

Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Integrated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=115

Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=23691

By the way, when Synergy 10 is released later this year you will have a choice of two development environments. We’ll continue to support Visual Studio 2010, but we’ll also support Visual Studio 2012 … and there is an Integrated Shell available for it too, but the requirements are a little different. There is also something called Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Isolated), and you have to install that before you can install the Integrated Shell.

Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Isolated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29927

Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Integrated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29912

By the way, it appears that the Visual Studio 2012 RC Integrated Shell installation may have a problem. I found that it reported errors about missing components when I tried to install it. I also found that if I did a reboot between installing Isolated Shell and Integrated Shell – the errors went away!

If you do decide to play with Synergy 10 (the beta will be out very soon now) and Visual Studio 2012, and we really hope that you all will, remember that Visual Studio 2012 is currently release candidate. When the final product ships later in the year there will be new Isolated and Integrated shells to download and install.


Microsoft Surface

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 18, 2012 at 8:01 pm

Get ready … here comes the big push! Microsoft today announced a new Windows 8 based tablet platform that they are calling “Microsoft Surface” (strange choice of a name, they already had a product with that name and it was literally the size of a table!), and they are boldly claiming that it will rival the almighty iPad. But then again they’d have to say that, otherwise people probably wouldn’t pay much attention!

surfaceDetails are still somewhat “sketchy” but it appears that there will be two initial models, the “Surface for Windows RT” which uses an NVIDIA ARM processor, and the thicker and heavier “Surface for Windows 8 Pro” tablet which uses an Intel Core i5 (Ivy Bridge) processor and not surprisingly will include a significantly larger battery.

You can find Microsoft information about the new device here, and Engadget have a pretty good write-up that addresses the differences between the two models which you can find here.

https://youtu.be/dpzu3HM2CIo


Microsoft Removes Installer Project Templates from Visual Studio 2012

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 13, 2012 at 8:09 am

Microsoft has recently announced that the various “Visual Studio Installer” project templates that were included in Visual Studio 2010 will NOT be included in Visual Studio 2012. These project templates are used within Visual Studio 2010 to build Windows Installer setup packages for .NET applications.

I’m writing this post because one of the 2012 tutorials that was published during our recent DevPartner conferences was based on using these these project templates; it showed developers how to build an installation package for a simple windows application. I wanted let customers know that the specific mechanism taught during the tutorial will not work in future versions of Visual Studio.

Bear in mind, however, the end result of the tutorial is a “standard” Windows Installer MSI package, and many of the techniques and concepts presented are still very much applicable to building any Windows Installer packages using other products.

Unfortunately there will no longer be any free tools for building installations included with Visual Studio, so developers will likely have to select one of several third-party products (e.g. InstallShield) to build their installation packages.


Synergy/DE On-Line Tutorials

By Steve Ives, Posted on at 7:24 am

During the 2011 Synergex Conferences we introduced several self-paced tutorials that allowed developers to work through various programming scenarios in order to learn new development techniques or become familiar with new Synergy/DE features. In all we published sixteen tutorials last year, and the feedback that we received from customers was very positive.

Because of the success of the tutorials in 2011 we decided to repeat the process for the 2012 DevPartner conferences, introducing another sixteen tutorials covering a wide range of subjects. Again the feedback from customers has been extremely positive.

During the conferences we provided a Virtual Machine pre-configured with the required development tools and data files, but we also wanted to make the tutorials available to a much wider audience, so I am delighted to announce that the tutorials are now available on-line at http://tutorials.synergex.com.

On this web site you will find a brief description of each of the tutorials, as well as information about any prerequisites for each tutorial. Most of the tutorials are completed either in Workbench or Visual Studio, so generally you’ll need a Windows system with a recent version of Synergy/DE (some tutorials require the very latest version), Visual Studio 2010 SP1, and Synergy Language Integration for Visual Studio. There is a requirements page on the web site that goes into much more detail.

The tutorials are downloaded and accessed via a tutorials client application which can be downloaded and installed (via Click-Once) by clicking the install button on the Download page.

Once you installed the tutorials client application it will present a list of the available tutorials. A globe icon to the right indicates that the tutorial has not been downloaded, and a hard drive icon indicates that the tutorial has been downloaded to your system.

Once you have downloaded a tutorial you can double-click on it to view the instructions for the tutorial. If the tutorial includes pre-configured Workbench workspaces or Visual Studio solutions then toolbar buttons provide quick access to those items.

The sixteen tutorials from 2011 are available immediately, and the sixteen new tutorials from the 2012 conference will become available on-line on Thursday 14th June.

We hope that you enjoy the tutorials and find them useful.

Synergex Professional Services Group


CodeGen 4.1 Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 7, 2012 at 12:48 am

Recently I announced that our code generator, CodeGen, had been published on CodePlex for everyone to use. Today I am delighted to announce that we have released a new version of CodeGen which includes some significant new features.

It is now possible to generate code which is based on information drawn from multiple repository structures, which makes it possible to generate many more types of routines and classes than ever before.

Also we have added the ability to launch code generation based on a repository file definition. CodeGen will make any structures that are assigned to the file available to the template when generating code.

We’re now starting planning for the next release. CodeGen can already be used to generate code for Synergy Language, C#, Visual Basic and Objective-C, and one of the features we’ll be adding in the next release is data type mappings and new field loop tokens for the Java language.

For more information about CodeGen refer to the CodeGen site on CodePlex, which you will find at http://codegen.codeplex.com.


LinkedIn Passwords Hacked

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 6, 2012 at 7:27 pm

It is being widely reported today that password information from the social network site LinkedIn has been compromised. It is currently unclear at whether matching username information (email addresses) has also been compromised.

I STRONGLY recommend that LinkedIn users change their passwords as soon as possible. And if you are in the habit of using the same password on multiple web sites, many of which use an email address as a username, then I would recommend that you change your password on those other sites also.


Windows 8 Release Preview Available Now

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 31, 2012 at 11:42 pm

If you hadn’t already heard, Microsoft today announced that the Windows 8 Release Preview is now available for download. As I talked about in my Introduction to Windows 8 session at the DevPartner Conference in Chicago, my colleagues and I are strongly urging all Synergy developers who build and deploy Synergy applications on Windows to download the release preview now and start testing your installations and applications.

If you attended my session you will know that there are some significant changes in Windows 8 that developers need to be aware of, and we want to help our customers to avoid any potential problems when Windows 8 starts shipping.

As well as the new operating system there is also a new version of the .NET Framework (4.5) which is an “upgrade” to Framework 4.0. This upgrade will be delivered to systems via Windows Update, and replaces the 4.0 version. We have already encountered problems with several existing .NET applications (not just Synergy .NET, just .NET generally) and we strongly advise you to test your .NET applications on Framework 4.5 also.

This version of Windows 8 is likely to be fairly close to whet the final released version will be, but Microsoft have already stated that they are still developing in some areas. If things go “as normal” then we might expect the final RTM (Release to Manufacturing) versions in around two months time, but no guarantees of course! Microsoft have also publicly stated that they are in good shape for a final release well in time for the 2012 “holiday season” … presumably they have big ideas about Santa Claus delivering lots of Windows 8 ARM-based tablets this year … we’ll have to wait and see how well that works out!

You can get more information and download the Windows 8 Release Preview here:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/release-preview

By the way, if you’re more interested in the server version of the O/S then the Windows Server 2012 Release Candidate is also available for download now:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/hh670538.aspx?ocid=&wt.mc_id=TEC_108_1_33

We’re still in conference mode here at Synergex, but once the UK conference in York is out of the way I’ll write more about the changes in Windows 8, and provide more information about what you need to know before your customers start buying Windows 8 systems.


DevPartner 2012, Chicago style.

By , Posted on May 28, 2012 at 1:20 am

Having just completed the three day conference in Chicago I felt the urge to write about the event.  Fun is most certainly a word I would use!  It’s a real blast.  That’s not to take away from the information exchange, education and general idea stimulation that occurred not only during the conference times but throughout the informal evening receptions, which always stimulate great debate.

This year’s agenda is a mix of technical presentations and self-paced tutorials – a total of sixteen brand new tutorials to test and tax your brain and to expand your knowledge of just what Synergy can do today!  Although all the tutorials use Visual studio or Workbench as the development environment, many of them introduce capabilities which are cross platform, as you would expect with Synergy!  And the presentations themselves cover many subjects including the upcoming Windows 8 operating system from Microsoft – will your software be ready?

Tuesday starts the conference with a detailed review of everything Synergy – and I bet there are quite a few enhancements and new features you never knew existed.   Then we move into unchartered territory for the Professional Services Group – Open Source.  We will show you two great new Open Source projects that we have created, and invite you to join the community and collaborate together to build some great tools and frameworks.  So come and join the orchestra and help us all to take full advantage of Synergy and Synergy .NET.  And that’s not all, we’ll have you all hooked up by lunch!

Wednesday kicks off with the development team presenting future thoughts and Synergy opportunities.  And of course their unique take on the issues that will affect you – even before you’ve thought of them! Watch out for the pesky new disk drives, they will hurt you if you are not ready!  And what do you store on a disk drive – data of course.  Wednesday is data day so you can be as selective as you like with the information you receive, but be sure to update those brain cells you’ll need to remember it all.

Thursday starts with the Synergy brain strain – pitching your knowledge and skills against my grey matter manipulating questions.  We’ll blow away those early morning cobwebs ready for the final day of presentations and tutorials.  Hold onto your input windows as we show you how utilize Synergy .NET and tweak your UI toolkit programs.  And we’ll get all %NM$N%REFrrF$%£GRT&FSD£$FSD– that’s encrypted so you’ll need to attend the presentation to know what I said.  Get ready to jump on the metro and take a tour of the Windows 8 OS – you’ll be amazed, but is it right for your customers?

Throughout the conference the sessions are informative and thought provoking.  Being described by one customer as a cross between Monty Python and Austin Powers one wonders how educational the event really was – but I was assured they’d learnt a whole lot of new things about Synergy and our amazing Synergy .NET environment.

And so the DevPartner 2012 conference hits the road and will be rolling up to York, England, on the 12th June.  Do you think you have the knowledge to take on the Thursday morning Synergy brain strain quiz?  You’ll only know by signing up and being there.   There really is just too much information and opportunity to miss and I hope to see you there!


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