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CodeGen 5.5.2 Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on March 19, 2020 at 12:47 am

Steve Ives

Apologies for being only a few days after the last CodeGen release, but we’ve been hard at work and have added some really cool new features, and we wanted to share them with you as soon as possible. We have added support for complex expressions, which allow you to use AND, OR and NOT within expression tokens, and also allows you to use parentheses to explicitly define precedence. Here are some examples:

<IF expression_1 AND expression_2>
[code]
</IF>

<IF expression_1 OR expression_2>
[code]
</IF>

<IF NOT expression_1>
[code]
</IF>

<IF NOT expression_1 AND expression_2>
[code]
</IF>

<IF expression_1 AND(expression_2 OR expression_3)>
[code]
</IF>

<IF expression_1 OR expression_2>
[code]
<ELSE expression_3 AND expression_4>
[code]
<ELSE>
[code]
</IF>

We hope you’re as excited as we are about these significant new capabilities.


CodeGen 5.5.1 Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on March 16, 2020 at 10:04 pm

Steve Ives

We are pleased to announce a new CodeGen release that includes a significant new feature named Complex ELSE Clauses. We have some big plans to further enhance IF/ELSE expressions, but for now this initial new feature can be used to simplify complex template file expressions. Here are the full release notes for the new version, which can be downloaded from https://github.com/Synergex/CodeGen/releases.

  • We added support for Complex ELSE Clauses within expressions, which allow multiple expressions of the same type to be evaluated within a single template file construct. We have future plans to extend the capabilities of expressions even further, but for now this new capability can be used to simplify template file code.
  • We improved the error checking that occurs when a processing a Harmony Core Customization File.
  • When using the CodeGen API we have added the ability to specify lists of file overrides at the TaskSet level.
  • We corrected an error that was causing the <HARMONYCORE_BRIDGE_PARAMETER_TYPE> custom expansion token to return incorrect values for structure parameters.
  • This version of CodeGen was built with Synergy/DE 11.1.1c and requires a minimum of version 10.1.1 to operate.

Call to Action for Windows UI Toolkit Developers

By Steve Ives, Posted on February 25, 2020 at 5:06 pm

Steve Ives

In recent months several customers have reported significant slow-downs in their Windows UI Toolkit applications when upgrading to Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016. We’ve been researching this issue, and we believe that much of the slow down resulted from alterations that Microsoft made in the operating system to mitigate the Windows Spectre-Meltdown issues.

In an attempt to mitigate these performance changes, and working in conjunction with one customer that had reported the issue to us, we have been working on various performance optimizations in the Synergy runtime related to low-level window creation, and for the Toolkit file-stack routines when using large lists. The new runtime also has UI improvements related to scaling of fonts on high-DPI monitors, most notably when moving a toolkit application between monitors with different DPI settings in Windows 10. This work is now complete, and we believe it has resulted in significant improvements in performance, which we hope will largely restore previous levels of performance.

We have performed as much internal testing as possible, and the customer we have been working with has also reported good results when testing the new runtime. We would like to be able to ship these improvements in the next Synergy release in the May timeframe, but before we can do that, we need to have several other Windows UI Toolkit developers validate that the changes do not cause any other unforeseen issues in their applications.

What we are asking you to do is to install your application onto a Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016 (or higher) that has Synergy 11.1.1c installed, apply a special runtime patch that we will provide, and test your application. There is no need to re-compile your code; just run your application in the patched 11.1.1c environment and look for any UI issues. You would be looking for any visual anomalies in the UI Toolkit user interface, regions not being painted or cleared correctly, etc.

We believe that our recent runtime changes can deliver significant runtime performance improvements for a lot of users, but because of the significant nature of the internal changes, we need help validating those changes in real user scenarios.

Can you help? If so please contact us as soon as possible, either via Developer Support or through your Synergex Account Representative.


SDI Developer Build 2704 Now Available

By Steve Ives, Posted on February 21, 2020 at 2:04 pm

Steve Ives

We are continually working on improvements to our Synergy DBL Integration for Visual Studio (SDI) product, and we are pleased to announce the release of a new developer build #2704, which is available for immediate download.

This release contains some important improvements in the debugging environment, and also contains some enhancements to IntelliSense related to indexed groups and indexer properties. We also made some improvements in the category options in the new project dialog in  Visual Studio 2019.

If you are running an earlier version 11 release of SDI then we recommend you upgrade immediately to take advantage of these improvements, and if not then you should consider doing so, at least for your development tools. Remember that you can use runtime version targeting to produce binary software for older runtime versions if you’re not ready to upgrade your customer or production systems yet.



Help Us Help You!

By Steve Ives, Posted on February 9, 2020 at 3:51 pm

Steve Ives

As many of you already know, after a little over twenty-two years working as a Senior Consultant in the Professional Services Group, I recently transitioned to a new role as Product Manager here at Synergex. I’m excited about this change because it means that not only will I will have a much more significant role in determining the future roadmap for Synergy/DE and related products, but I also get to continue working directly with our customers.

One of the primary driving factors for some of the recent role changes here at Synergex is our desire to become more market-driven when it comes to determining future product enhancements. In part, we will achieve this by continuing to pay close attention to what the industry as a whole is doing. But a large part of our strategy going forward is based on working more closely with our customers when building new feature lists and future product roadmaps.

Product management is an entirely new area of expertise for me, and it will take some time to become fully competent in my new role. To help me with this transition, I was asked to attend a two-day Product Management conference, which I must say was an interesting and informative experience. I learned a lot, not least of which was that I learned how much more I have to learn!

I don’t want to criticize the event that I attended, which was on the whole very well put together, so I’m not going to name the event, which was attended by product managers from some large organizations that everyone would immediately recognize. It wasn’t an unusually large event; I estimate there were perhaps 200 people in attendance.

In the spirit of honesty, here comes the sales pitch! I have been attending Synergex conferences since the early 1990s, first as a customer, then as a partner, and later as an employee. I can honestly say that nobody does it better when it comes to offering an environment with such abundant learning opportunities AND the chance to network with peers. The conference I just returned from cited peer networking as a benefit also, but in reality, it didn’t happen. For whatever reason, many delegates didn’t seem to want to interact, but also, the event schedule and venue didn’t promote that valuable interaction either.

The 2020 Synergex DevPartner conference is being held in Sacramento, CA this year, and we all hope to see you there. If you have attended one of our events in the past, then you already know what an excellent opportunity it is. If you haven’t joined us in the past, I encourage you to not miss out on this unique opportunity this year. For additional information check out the conference website.

As I settle into my new role, you’ll be seeing more blog posts introducing things we’re considering, and some of you will hear from me directly as I try to extend existing relationships and build new ones. My point of contact with your company will be with some specifically nominated person, but I want to hear from all of you! If your life is in any way touched by Synergy/DE, or by related products such as Harmony Core, and you have something to say, good or bad, I want to hear it.

One way for you to provide feedback is through our Ideas forum, but if you prefer to contact me individually, that’s OK too. I’m not going to post an email address here because I don’t want to deal with a thousand replies from BOTs, but try first name dot last name at synergex.com. That should put us in touch.

I look forward to hearing from you.


Synergy/DE 11.1.1c Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on January 29, 2020 at 6:23 pm

Steve Ives

Important quality improvements for REV11 licensing

A new patch release for Windows and Unix is now available to download on the Synergex website. All customers are encouraged to update to 11.1.1c for important quality improvements.

This update includes new versions of the following products:

  • Synergy/DE (32- and 64-bit)
  • REV11 licensing upgrade package (32- and 64-bit, delivered in one installer on Windows)
  • Synergy DBL Integration for Visual Studio
11.1.1c includes quality improvements for the following issues:
  • IMPORTANT: Previously, in REV11 licensing environments, an expired license error could occur if a license allocated by a program expired while the program was running. Even if new keys had been delivered and installed, if the license server had not been restarted since the new keys were installed, the error could occur.

    It is important that all customers using subscription licensing in a REV11 environment install the 11.1.1c patch (for version 11 systems) or apply the 11.1.1c version of the licensing upgrade package (for version 9 or 10 systems).

    If for any reason you are not able to do so, you should ensure that your license server is restarted as soon as possible after your new subscription keys are delivered. Long-running processes are resilient to a license server restart.

  • In versions 11.1.1a and 11.1.1b, if an attempt to rename a remote file (via xfServer) resulted in an error being generated, in some cases xfServer could fail with a segmentation fault.
  • In versions 11.1.1 through 11.1.1b, using the isutl utility to re-index a large multi-key ISAM file with an index exceeding 4,294,967,295 bytes caused a corrupted index to be created.
  • In versions 11.1.1 through 11.1.1b, when running xfServer in Secure or Trusted mode, a client using the RUSER mechanism to provide login credentials to the server experienced a “Bad username, login rejected” error.
  • In versions 11.1.1 through 11.1.1b, in some circumstances when opening a remote file via xfServer when that server did not already have other files open, the xfServer process could fail.
The patch also includes the following enhancements to Synergy DBL Integration for Visual Studio:
  • We significantly enhanced the Visual Studio build system for Synergy .NET projects by improving the dependency-checking algorithms. Previously, any change in the code of, for example, a class library caused all projects that reference that library to be rebuilt. With these changes in place, dependent projects will only be rebuilt if changes in the dependency library result in the signatures of externally visible items being added, changed, or removed. This will result in a significant reduction in elapsed build times in many cases.

  • We improved the hover-over information (QuickInfo) displayed for type declarations for variables, fields, properties, etc. We added simple colorization and documentation comments (when available), and in some cases, type names are now fully qualified.

See the release notes for a complete list of 11.1.1c changes. See the Synergy/DE 11 page for information about the latest Synergy/DE features.

Visual Studio Adaptive Formatting

By Steve Ives, Posted on January 24, 2020 at 4:32 pm

Steve Ives

In Microsoft Visual Studio version 16.4 a new feature was, I was going to say introduced, but snuck in might be more appropriate way of describing things. There was no mention of the new feature in any release notes that we can find, and an internet search for the name of the new feature currently returns no useful matches!

The feature is called Adaptive Formatting and apparently what it does is allows code editor windows to “heuristically determine if the current file should use tabs or spaces for indentation”. Previously this behavior was determined by a language specific setting, and those settings are still present, but if Adaptive Formatting is enabled (which it is by default by the way), then it wins!

So if your code is indented with tabs, and suddenly Visual Studio decides to start using spaces instead (or vice-versa) then it’s probably Adaptive Formatting getting it wrong! Thankfully this new feature can be disabled by going into Tools > Options > Text Editor > Advanced and un-checking the Use adaptive formatting option.

Happy coding everyone!



SQL Replication – Significant New Features

By Steve Ives, Posted on January 16, 2020 at 8:10 pm

Steve Ives

In recent weeks we have been working on making improvements to our SQL Replication environment, which demonstrates how to easily replicate your Synergy data to a SQL Server database. Some of these changes were undertaken in collaboration with a customer that uses the environment extensively, and we thank them for their input and support. Other changes have been on our road-map for some time and we think you’ll be excited about what has been achieved. Here’s a summary of the changes:

  • Synergy 11 introduced a new SQL Connection API capability which calls the ODBC API function SQLDescribeParam behind the scenes to improve performance and avoid excessive cache memory thrashing for SQL statements that have I/O parameters when accessing SQL Server (VTX12_SQLNATIVE). Synergex recommend setting SSQL_PERFORMANCE_SQL to yes (or setting the SQLPERFORMANCESQL environment variable. We have updated the environment to do this, which should result in improved performance when running in Synergy 11 or higher environments.
  • We have added the ability to run multiple instances of the replicator process side-by-side, within a single data set, and to divide up the replication of different files between these multiple replicator instances. Each instance is assigned a unique instance name and has its own associated instruction queue file, the name of which includes the instance name, as does the log file produced by each instance. In a multi-instance environment developers can chose on a file-by-file bases which data files are replicated via which queue file, and therefor via which replicator instance. It is important to understand that in this scenario there is no synchronization of the sequence in which changes are applied to the underlying SQL database between the multiple instances of the replicator.
  • We have added the ability to exclude certain fields in a record from being appearing in and being replicated to the associated SQL Server database table. It is important that fields associated with keys not be excluded, unless those keys are also excluded (see the next item). Generally the fewer fields/columns that are replicated the faster the replication will be.
  • We have added the ability to exclude certain keys from processing, so that matching database indexes will not be created in the associated database tables. Generally the fewer indexes that exist on a table the faster the replication will be.
  • We have added the ability for the replicator to detect some kinds of database failure, caused by network errors, or the database being shut down or otherwise unavailable, and allow it to gracefully disconnect, and then attempt to reconnect, with a configurable number of retries and retry interval. This should make the replicator processes more robust.
  • We have added the ability to change the database datatypes of fields. The main use case envisaged is transforming decimal fields into implied decimal fields (adding decimal places in the database data), but there may be other use cases, such as transforming Y/N fields into Boolean true/false fields, etc.
  • We have also corrected an issue that could occur if replicator encountered an unexpected error and was configured to use BATCH COMMIT mode. Is some circumstances, if there were uncommitted changes at the time on an error any uncommitted changes could be lost because the change records were deleted from the instruction queue one by one before the batch was committed. Now any instructions related to uncommitted changes remain in the queue file until the batch is committed, and are then all deleted. When the replicator is restarted it will then attempt to reply the changes to the database again. This should help prevent the database getting out of sync if there is a replicator failure.

We’re excited about these new features in our SQL Replication offering and looking forward to hearing your feedback. By the way, many of these new features rely on using the latest and greatest version of CodeGen (5.4.8) which was also released today. If you’re already using an earlier version of the SQL Replication environment, or if you are interested in getting started and would like some assistance, don’t hesitate to contact us through your Synergex Account Representative.


Harmony Core Office Hours, December 2019

By Harmony Core Team, Posted on December 17, 2019 at 4:26 pm

Avatar

Jeff and Steve give an update on Harmony Core development activities over the last six weeks, which included the following.

Traditional Bridge has been updated to use the new system.text.json parser and writer. This reduces overhead when running traditional Synergy methods, resulting in significant performance improvements (a full order of magnitude from what we’ve seen). This enhancement is built on the version 11 Synergy/DE runtime, so it requires version 11 on the traditional side of the bridge. Traditional Bridge still works with prior versions, but these versions can’t take advantage of the built-in JSON libraries that make the performance improvements possible.

We created a prototype with EF Core 3.1 support. Microsoft has completely reworked the model for providers, so this prototype took quite a bit of work. The reworked model is an improvement; it makes query analysis requirements more explicit, so the Harmony Core EF Provider does not have to do as much pattern mapping for optimization. We will continue to improve this support, and we’ll transition the project from prototype to production.

We also made several improvements to project templates. The metadata that is injected into data models has been extended, and some data models have additional attributes that improve the fidelity of generated documentation. These attributes provide additional information about the HTTP responses each operation endpoint can generate, along with the shape of the data that is returned by each operation. This should provide much better information for Swagger documentation. These changes will be checked into the Harmony Core Github repository in the next couple of days.

Finally, we fixed a customer-reported bug that caused duplicate items in multi-leg joins (issue 131), and we continued work on Harmony Core Generator, a utility designed to replace regen.bat and display relations.


Another Synergex Hackathon Is in the Books

By Jacklin Garcia, Posted on November 18, 2019 at 11:56 am

Jacklin Garcia

This October we hosted our second annual company-wide hackathon at Synergex. While our first attempt last year yielded better results than we expected, this year we outdid ourselves. From the quality of the projects to the logistical execution, this event was a home run. We’ve decided to adopt the hackathon as an annual tradition, because it’s proven to be the most successful team-bonding experience we’ve had, and it fits well with our corporate values of learning and initiative. If your company would like to join in on the fun, continue reading to find out more about our process, some of this year’s projects, and the things we’re still working to improve.

Opening Pitch

A week or two before the hackathon, we started with an optional brainstorming session, using a shared Google spreadsheet to capture all the project ideas that came out of the meeting. (I’ve found that sending an email with the sheet isn’t as effective for gathering input as getting everyone together. When there’s a dedicated time for this event, people show up and put their energy toward generating ideas. Plus, when one person explains their idea, it often sparks another from someone else.) We kept the sheet available for anyone to add ideas after the meeting as well.

The next event, a pitching session, took place about a week before the hackathon. The floor was open to anyone who wanted to lead a project from the ideas list or to suggest a new one. Participants raised their hands to express interest after each pitch. At the end of the session, we went through the list again and asked everyone to select their top project choice so we could start forming teams. This part was a little like herding cats, and not all projects that were pitched got picked up. However, we walked out of the room with teams decided.

Starting Lineup

A few days before the big event, we had a one-hour pre-hackathon workshop for teams to get together and plan. This was the time to download software, set up source control, and determine if any additional equipment was needed. By dedicating this preparation time, all teams could come into the hackathon ready to hack!

Our hackathon lasted roughly eight hours, plus time for meals and breaks. We started with breakfast and a quick presentation about logistics, and then the teams were off to start hacking. We largely left the teams alone, only announcing when lunch and snacks were available and giving a few time warnings before the clock ran out. Once hacking ended, the presentations and demos began. Each team had five minutes to share what they’d created.

After the presentations, everyone got to vote, and we asked that they not vote for their own team. Finally, we awarded prizes for the best hacks, and one team got to take possession of the coveted golden grabber arm until the next hackathon.

This Year’s Home Runs

We’d call this event a success regardless of what projects came out of it, simply due to the cross-team collaboration and energy that would be hard to replicate in any other way. BUT this year’s projects were also quite impressive, and we plan to implement several of them in whole or in part by the time next year’s event rolls around.

Team 1 worked on a proof of concept for online documentation for one of our products. This product previously had only paper manuals!

Team 2 put together a proposal for a corporate volunteer and giving program.

Team 3 researched a new collaboration tool and demonstrated how it could be set up for our company’s use.

Team 4 researched a new business line and created a commercial to promote the new business.

Team 5 created an API to access and print data from one of our productivity tools.

Team 6 made a proof of concept for a new UI for one of our products.

Team 7 had a plan for getting involved at local universities to increase our footprint in the greater Sacramento area. This included sponsoring their hackathons!

Base Hits and Foul Balls: Recommendations for Your Hackathon

You can do this too! Here are final dos and don’ts to consider when planning your own event:

  • Do have fun! For 2019, we themed our event (baseball!) and had that dictate food, team names, shirt design, and awful puns in pretty much all presentations and this blog post.
  • Don’t wait until the day of the hackathon to decide on project ideas.
  • Do explain logistics, including time limits for presentations/demos, up front.
  • Don’t wait until the end to take a group picture. Two years in a row, participants have left before we got the group photo. The start of the day might be a better time, or while votes are being counted.
  • Do have the hackathon open to all employees. Hacks don’t have to be technical! Our best projects seem to come from teams with mixed professional backgrounds.
  • Do have the WiFi password visible in all rooms, and test logistics prior to hack day.
  • Don’t make voting overly complicated.
  • Do host a fun social event after the hackathon. We’ve traditionally done this off site, but keeping it in the office allows teams to keep working on their project if they’d like to.

Reach out to the Synergex education team if you’d like some additional help getting started—or check out the Careers page on the Synergex website to join us for our 2020 hackathon!



Presenting in Synergy/DE 11.1.1: Select.Where.Like — You Should Like This

By Phil Bratt, Posted on October 21, 2019 at 9:09 am

Avatar

If you’ve ever been coached or trained in public speaking, you’ve probably been made painfully aware of your use of the dreaded filler words—words you say almost automatically when speaking and nervous. Everyone has their own flavor of it, but for me, it’s the word “like.” If I’m really nervous, I can end up sounding like Moon Unit Zappa in her single Valley Girl. (Millennials, ask your parents. Gen Z, ask your grandparents.)

But the word “like” gets a bad rap and in some uses is fine and perfectly acceptable, like making a comparison or at the beginning of a list talking about the uses of like. Today, though, I’m talking about like in the context of new features added to Synergy/DE in version 11. Which introduces the new system-supplied class Select.Where.Like.

If you aren’t familiar with the Select class in Synergy, where have you been? We’ve been harping on about this thing, like, forever. It’s a wonderful feature in the language for reading data in a SQL-like way. Well, the Select class now has even more functionality with the addition of the Like statement, allowing you to filter your alpha results based on a matching pattern. It’s similar to Where.Contains in that you can do the equivalent of Where.Contains with Where.Like, plus so much more. A Where.Contains is a Where.Like that has a “%” sign in the front and back, telling it to search the results for that string of characters anywhere in the field.

How does Select.Where.Like work?

MatchWildcardExample
Zero or more characters%bl% finds bl, black, blue, and blob
Single character_h_t finds hot, hat, and hit
Single character in a set[]h[oa]t finds hot and hat but not hit
Single character not in a set[^]h[^oa]t finds hit but not hot and hat
Single character in a range[-]c[a-c]t finds cat, cbt, and cc but not cot

Using the above wildcards, you can build your Where statement to look for a pattern inside a record field. For example, say you have a city address in the form CityName, ST(ate). Now let’s say you want all results from entries from CA where the city starts with “SAN”. What would this look like?

Where.Like(city_name,"San%,CA%")

Breaking this down, the first three characters are “San”, then there are one or more characters between “San” and our next part “,CA”, which can have one or more characters after it. This query should return results like San Francisco, San Diego, Santa Monica, and San Jose.

Note that you can do a Where.Like that is not case sensitive with NoCaseWhere.Like. The above statement wouldn’t find a city if “san” was in the body of the city name, like Pleasanton, CA. This is most helpful if your data is not uniform or consistent (like sometimes the state is ca or cA). To get the most use out of Where.Like, you should be familiar with your dataset and how information is entered and modified.

Getting an idea how this works

Let’s try something a little tougher. Let’s say you have data that contains postal codes, but the postal codes can be from different countries. Now you could combine your Where.Like with an AND to a field that has a country, but you could also handle it all within the Where.Like. For instance, let’s say the data has postal codes from three different countries: United States, United Kingdom, and Sweden. An example of each one would be

US: 99999
Sweden: 999 999
UK: varies but most commonly AA9 9AA

where 9 is a number and A is a letter.

If we wanted to be completely explicit, we could use these Where.Like statements:

US: [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] 
Sweden: [0-9][0-9][0-9] [0-9][0-9][0-9]
UK: [A-Z][A-Z][0-9] [0-9][A-Z][A-Z]

This is a manual way to handle it, but maybe we can do it with less. If we want only US and Sweden, we can use the fact that UK postal codes have letters to our advantage and go with a simple

US & Sweden: [^A-Z]%

This essentially equates to any postal code that doesn’t begin with a letter, which works for our simplified version of these countries’ postal codes. The opposite, [A-Z]%, also works if you want UK only.

If we want to do Sweden and the UK, we note that both contain a space in their postal codes, so

UK & Sweden: %[ ]%

This includes any postal code with a space in it. Now this is tricky, as these could be Synergy alpha types, and there might be trailing spaces at the end. To fix this scenario, we use a wildcard to say there is a number or letter after the space:

UK & Sweden: %[ ][0-9]%

This means that we are looking for a space with a number immediately following. However, unlike the last example, we can’t use the opposite of this to get US only, because %[^ ][^0-9]% actually works for all three countries if there are trailing spaces; a letter or number at the end followed by a non-numeric character works. For example, a UK postal code ending in “G” with trailing spaces satisfies this condition.

What’s unique about US postal codes, though, is that there are a series of four numbers in a row, and they have fewer total characters than the other two. Therefore, %[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]% would work, as would _ _ _ _ _  % (i.e., five wildcard spaces followed by a literal “ ”), as there would be a space afterwards if this were an alpha field, whereas it would be a numeric or alpha character in the UK or Swedish postal codes. Of course, this would be quite different in practice, because your searches would look more like “98_ [0-9]%” if you were looking for Swedish postal codes starting with 98. But the purpose here is to get you thinking with wildcards. This new feature has a lot of potential to optimize searches as it does when used inside of SQL. Be sure to try it out now in Synergy 11 and read more about this feature in our online documentation.


REV11 Licensing Required for DevPartner (Development) Licenses

By Cindy Limburg, Posted on October 15, 2019 at 11:37 am

Cindy Limburg

Synergex recently released REV11 licensing, a new revision to our licensing system on Windows and Unix. We’re excited to roll it out to you as it’s going to greatly simplify your management of Synergy product keys. REV11 licensing is included with Synergy/DE 11, and it also supports Synergy/DE 9.3 – 10.3 via the REV11 licensing upgrade package. I.e., you don’t have to upgrade to Synergy/DE 11 to use REV11 licensing. We also announced that REV11 licensing is required for Synergy/DE DevPartner (development) license renewals. So before your next DevPartner subscription renewal, download and install the licensing upgrade package on the license server(s) for your development systems. After your renewal, any new DevPartner licenses you add will use REV11 licensing.

After you install the REV11 licensing upgrade package, License Manager on your server will automatically send your licensee name and current registration string to the Synergy License Web Service, where the information will be used to locate the license for your system. Product keys are then generated, and License Manager will automatically download and install them.

Currently REV11 licensing is only required on your development systems. It is recommended but not required for deployment (production) systems. To learn more about REV11 licensing, view our REV11 licensing web page, our documentation, or watch the video below. If you have any questions or would like assistance with REV11 licensing, please contact Synergy/DE Developer Support at support@synergex.com, your account executive at synergy@synergex.com, or either team at (916) 635-7300.


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