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Are you Ready for Windows 8 and Synergy 10?

By Steve Ives, Posted on July 31, 2012 at 4:49 pm

Steve Ives

As discussed at the recent DevPartner Conferences, support for Synergy applications on Windows 8 will be introduced in Synergy 10, which is currently available as a beta release. Microsoft has announced the launch date for Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 will be October 26th, so it is reasonable to expect that the final versions of Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 will be available to developers via MSDN some time soon.

As well as introducing many new features and enhancements in Synergy .NET, Synergy 10 also includes some very significant new features on all of the Traditional Synergy platforms, particularly in the area of SDBMS (that’s ISAM to us mere mortals!). These changes are introduced in a new ISAM revision 6. It is important that you test your applications with Synergy 10 as soon as possible.

As soon as Windows 8 is available to your customers you are likely to start getting calls to install your applications on Windows 8, and that will REQUIRE you to install Synergy 10. At the very least, Synergex recommends that you install the Synergy 10 beta on a system (not necessarily Windows 8 ) and validate that your current application runs without errors. And if you don’t have s system to to that with, remember that it’s easy to build a Virtual Machine to use for testing.

Even better would be to rebuild your applications with version 10 and make sure you don’t have any issues there. And even better than that would be to do a little beta testing and try out some of the many cool new Synergy 10 features. There are even REWARDS for finding bugs!!!

You can find more information about Synergy 10 at http://www.synergyde.com/products/synergyde_beta.aspx


Beauty and the Beast

By , Posted on June 22, 2012 at 2:28 am

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With every advancing version of Synergy/DE we are better armed to tame the beast!  For me one of the biggest beasts in a commercial application is a record lock.  This beast will appear without warning, leave no trace of its being, and always instils rage in the innocent users of the system who encounter it.

Although locking records is a fundamental requirement of any application it is always difficult to explain to a user who has been sat there for ten minutes with a “record locked” message flashing on the screen that “the system is functioning correctly”.  All they want to do is move forward and finish the task in hand.

So who has that rouge record locked?  Which line of code is actually causing the lock?  Is the lock valid?  How long has the lock been there?  If we could answer these questions then life would be so much easier.  So how can we tame the record lock beast?  With Synergy 9.5.3b of course!

If you attended the DevPartner conference in either Chicago or York then you would have seen my presentation “Hooked Line & Sinker”.  During the session I presented the new (and extremely cool) IO Hooks class that allows you to hook methods to the various events that occur around SDBMS data access.  For example you can register methods that are executed every time a record is read, stored, updated or deleted.  And given this capability I demonstrated the beautiful Synergy DBMS Lock Viewer.  By assigning my LockRecorder class to every file opened in update mode (a single line code change to my standard file open routine) I was able to record lock information in a central “lock manager” control file.  The Synergy DBMS Lock Viewer program I wrote then reads this file and displays lock information.

And the real beauty was just today.  Having modified a customer’s application to utilise the LockRecorder class I was able to run the Lock Viewer:

And immediately identify who was locking which records in which programs and how long the locks had been there.  It’s beautiful to just sit and watch the lock information appear and then clear – and when they don’t clear we call the culpritJ.  The usual response was “I just nipped out to get a cuppa”.  Maybe not the users fault, but now I know where to look in the program to see if I can prevent the lock being required.

If you are interested in the example code you can use the “Knock Knock Who’s Locked” tutorial which steps you through the whole process of creating the LockRecorder class and monitoring the lock manager control file.  The tutorial, along with all conference tutorials, can be downloaded from http://tutorials.synergex.com/.


Synergy .NET Without Purchasing Visual Studio

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 20, 2012 at 1:16 pm

Steve Ives

It occurs to me that we may have forgotten to tell you about something important … sorry! Of course if you were at either of the recent Synergex DevPartner conferences then you will already know this, but if not then “listen up” because this could save you some money!

The development environment for Synergy .NET is provided by Microsoft Visual Studio. For Synergy 9 we support Visual Studio 2010 Professional or higher. If a developer wants to develop with Synergy .NET then they would install Synergy/DE and Visual Studio 2010, and then install “Synergy Language Integration for Visual Studio” (we call it SLI because it’s less of a mouthful) to add all of the Synergy .NET capabilities and templates alongside the other Microsoft languages like C# and Visual Basic. Many developers already have Visual Studio 2010 so this isn’t a problem … but what if you don’t?

Well … good news! In addition to purchasing Visual Studio 2010 there is also a free solution. It’s called Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Integrated) and you can download it directly from Microsoft. Basically the Integrated Shell is a bare bones version of Visual Studio, with all of the other languages stripped out. It’s not much use on its own, but if you install it and then install SLI … hey presto you have a full Synergy .NET development environment!

If you do decide to try this out then please remember that Synergy .NET requires Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1, so you’ll need to install that after installing Integrated Shell, but before installing SLI.

You can download the files that you’ll need from these locations:

Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Integrated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=115

Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=23691

By the way, when Synergy 10 is released later this year you will have a choice of two development environments. We’ll continue to support Visual Studio 2010, but we’ll also support Visual Studio 2012 … and there is an Integrated Shell available for it too, but the requirements are a little different. There is also something called Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Isolated), and you have to install that before you can install the Integrated Shell.

Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Isolated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29927

Visual Studio 2012 RC Shell (Integrated)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29912

By the way, it appears that the Visual Studio 2012 RC Integrated Shell installation may have a problem. I found that it reported errors about missing components when I tried to install it. I also found that if I did a reboot between installing Isolated Shell and Integrated Shell – the errors went away!

If you do decide to play with Synergy 10 (the beta will be out very soon now) and Visual Studio 2012, and we really hope that you all will, remember that Visual Studio 2012 is currently release candidate. When the final product ships later in the year there will be new Isolated and Integrated shells to download and install.


Microsoft Surface

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 18, 2012 at 8:01 pm

Steve Ives

Get ready … here comes the big push! Microsoft today announced a new Windows 8 based tablet platform that they are calling “Microsoft Surface” (strange choice of a name, they already had a product with that name and it was literally the size of a table!), and they are boldly claiming that it will rival the almighty iPad. But then again they’d have to say that, otherwise people probably wouldn’t pay much attention!

surfaceDetails are still somewhat “sketchy” but it appears that there will be two initial models, the “Surface for Windows RT” which uses an NVIDIA ARM processor, and the thicker and heavier “Surface for Windows 8 Pro” tablet which uses an Intel Core i5 (Ivy Bridge) processor and not surprisingly will include a significantly larger battery.

You can find Microsoft information about the new device here, and Engadget have a pretty good write-up that addresses the differences between the two models which you can find here.


Microsoft Removes Installer Project Templates from Visual Studio 2012

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 13, 2012 at 8:09 am

Steve Ives

Microsoft has recently announced that the various “Visual Studio Installer” project templates that were included in Visual Studio 2010 will NOT be included in Visual Studio 2012. These project templates are used within Visual Studio 2010 to build Windows Installer setup packages for .NET applications.

I’m writing this post because one of the 2012 tutorials that was published during our recent DevPartner conferences was based on using these these project templates; it showed developers how to build an installation package for a simple windows application. I wanted let customers know that the specific mechanism taught during the tutorial will not work in future versions of Visual Studio.

Bear in mind, however, the end result of the tutorial is a “standard” Windows Installer MSI package, and many of the techniques and concepts presented are still very much applicable to building any Windows Installer packages using other products.

Unfortunately there will no longer be any free tools for building installations included with Visual Studio, so developers will likely have to select one of several third-party products (e.g. InstallShield) to build their installation packages.


Synergy/DE On-Line Tutorials

By Steve Ives, Posted on at 7:24 am

Steve Ives

During the 2011 Synergex Conferences we introduced several self-paced tutorials that allowed developers to work through various programming scenarios in order to learn new development techniques or become familiar with new Synergy/DE features. In all we published sixteen tutorials last year, and the feedback that we received from customers was very positive.

Because of the success of the tutorials in 2011 we decided to repeat the process for the 2012 DevPartner conferences, introducing another sixteen tutorials covering a wide range of subjects. Again the feedback from customers has been extremely positive.

During the conferences we provided a Virtual Machine pre-configured with the required development tools and data files, but we also wanted to make the tutorials available to a much wider audience, so I am delighted to announce that the tutorials are now available on-line at http://tutorials.synergex.com.

On this web site you will find a brief description of each of the tutorials, as well as information about any prerequisites for each tutorial. Most of the tutorials are completed either in Workbench or Visual Studio, so generally you’ll need a Windows system with a recent version of Synergy/DE (some tutorials require the very latest version), Visual Studio 2010 SP1, and Synergy Language Integration for Visual Studio. There is a requirements page on the web site that goes into much more detail.

The tutorials are downloaded and accessed via a tutorials client application which can be downloaded and installed (via Click-Once) by clicking the install button on the Download page.

Once you installed the tutorials client application it will present a list of the available tutorials. A globe icon to the right indicates that the tutorial has not been downloaded, and a hard drive icon indicates that the tutorial has been downloaded to your system.

Once you have downloaded a tutorial you can double-click on it to view the instructions for the tutorial. If the tutorial includes pre-configured Workbench workspaces or Visual Studio solutions then toolbar buttons provide quick access to those items.

The sixteen tutorials from 2011 are available immediately, and the sixteen new tutorials from the 2012 conference will become available on-line on Thursday 14th June.

We hope that you enjoy the tutorials and find them useful.

Synergex Professional Services Group


CodeGen 4.1 Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 7, 2012 at 12:48 am

Steve Ives

Recently I announced that our code generator, CodeGen, had been published on CodePlex for everyone to use. Today I am delighted to announce that we have released a new version of CodeGen which includes some significant new features.

It is now possible to generate code which is based on information drawn from multiple repository structures, which makes it possible to generate many more types of routines and classes than ever before.

Also we have added the ability to launch code generation based on a repository file definition. CodeGen will make any structures that are assigned to the file available to the template when generating code.

We’re now starting planning for the next release. CodeGen can already be used to generate code for Synergy Language, C#, Visual Basic and Objective-C, and one of the features we’ll be adding in the next release is data type mappings and new field loop tokens for the Java language.

For more information about CodeGen refer to the CodeGen site on CodePlex, which you will find at http://codegen.codeplex.com.


LinkedIn Passwords Hacked

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 6, 2012 at 7:27 pm

Steve Ives

It is being widely reported today that password information from the social network site LinkedIn has been compromised. It is currently unclear at whether matching username information (email addresses) has also been compromised.

I STRONGLY recommend that LinkedIn users change their passwords as soon as possible. And if you are in the habit of using the same password on multiple web sites, many of which use an email address as a username, then I would recommend that you change your password on those other sites also.


Windows 8 Release Preview Available Now

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 31, 2012 at 11:42 pm

Steve Ives

If you hadn’t already heard, Microsoft today announced that the Windows 8 Release Preview is now available for download. As I talked about in my Introduction to Windows 8 session at the DevPartner Conference in Chicago, my colleagues and I are strongly urging all Synergy developers who build and deploy Synergy applications on Windows to download the release preview now and start testing your installations and applications.

If you attended my session you will know that there are some significant changes in Windows 8 that developers need to be aware of, and we want to help our customers to avoid any potential problems when Windows 8 starts shipping.

As well as the new operating system there is also a new version of the .NET Framework (4.5) which is an “upgrade” to Framework 4.0. This upgrade will be delivered to systems via Windows Update, and replaces the 4.0 version. We have already encountered problems with several existing .NET applications (not just Synergy .NET, just .NET generally) and we strongly advise you to test your .NET applications on Framework 4.5 also.

This version of Windows 8 is likely to be fairly close to whet the final released version will be, but Microsoft have already stated that they are still developing in some areas. If things go “as normal” then we might expect the final RTM (Release to Manufacturing) versions in around two months time, but no guarantees of course! Microsoft have also publicly stated that they are in good shape for a final release well in time for the 2012 “holiday season” … presumably they have big ideas about Santa Claus delivering lots of Windows 8 ARM-based tablets this year … we’ll have to wait and see how well that works out!

You can get more information and download the Windows 8 Release Preview here:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/release-preview

By the way, if you’re more interested in the server version of the O/S then the Windows Server 2012 Release Candidate is also available for download now:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/hh670538.aspx?ocid=&wt.mc_id=TEC_108_1_33

We’re still in conference mode here at Synergex, but once the UK conference in York is out of the way I’ll write more about the changes in Windows 8, and provide more information about what you need to know before your customers start buying Windows 8 systems.


DevPartner 2012, Chicago style.

By , Posted on May 28, 2012 at 1:20 am

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Having just completed the three day conference in Chicago I felt the urge to write about the event.  Fun is most certainly a word I would use!  It’s a real blast.  That’s not to take away from the information exchange, education and general idea stimulation that occurred not only during the conference times but throughout the informal evening receptions, which always stimulate great debate.

This year’s agenda is a mix of technical presentations and self-paced tutorials – a total of sixteen brand new tutorials to test and tax your brain and to expand your knowledge of just what Synergy can do today!  Although all the tutorials use Visual studio or Workbench as the development environment, many of them introduce capabilities which are cross platform, as you would expect with Synergy!  And the presentations themselves cover many subjects including the upcoming Windows 8 operating system from Microsoft – will your software be ready?

Tuesday starts the conference with a detailed review of everything Synergy – and I bet there are quite a few enhancements and new features you never knew existed.   Then we move into unchartered territory for the Professional Services Group – Open Source.  We will show you two great new Open Source projects that we have created, and invite you to join the community and collaborate together to build some great tools and frameworks.  So come and join the orchestra and help us all to take full advantage of Synergy and Synergy .NET.  And that’s not all, we’ll have you all hooked up by lunch!

Wednesday kicks off with the development team presenting future thoughts and Synergy opportunities.  And of course their unique take on the issues that will affect you – even before you’ve thought of them! Watch out for the pesky new disk drives, they will hurt you if you are not ready!  And what do you store on a disk drive – data of course.  Wednesday is data day so you can be as selective as you like with the information you receive, but be sure to update those brain cells you’ll need to remember it all.

Thursday starts with the Synergy brain strain – pitching your knowledge and skills against my grey matter manipulating questions.  We’ll blow away those early morning cobwebs ready for the final day of presentations and tutorials.  Hold onto your input windows as we show you how utilize Synergy .NET and tweak your UI toolkit programs.  And we’ll get all %NM$N%REFrrF$%£GRT&FSD£$FSD– that’s encrypted so you’ll need to attend the presentation to know what I said.  Get ready to jump on the metro and take a tour of the Windows 8 OS – you’ll be amazed, but is it right for your customers?

Throughout the conference the sessions are informative and thought provoking.  Being described by one customer as a cross between Monty Python and Austin Powers one wonders how educational the event really was – but I was assured they’d learnt a whole lot of new things about Synergy and our amazing Synergy .NET environment.

And so the DevPartner 2012 conference hits the road and will be rolling up to York, England, on the 12th June.  Do you think you have the knowledge to take on the Thursday morning Synergy brain strain quiz?  You’ll only know by signing up and being there.   There really is just too much information and opportunity to miss and I hope to see you there!


CodeGen Goes Open Source

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 22, 2012 at 9:45 am

Steve Ives

For several years now I have been developing a tool called CodeGen. As you may have already guessed from the name, it’s a code generator! What’s a code generator? It’s a tool that generates code … sounds useful, right?

Well it is useful, in many different situations. Not all situations of course. If a code generator could generate ANY piece of source code that you might need then we wouldn’t need programmers any more … so why would a programmer write such a tool?

OK I jest a little. Believe me, if it were possible to write such a tool then I would have done it, and I’d have made a lot of money from it, and I probably wouldn’t be sitting here writing this BLOG right now 🙂 No, of course it’s not possible to write a tool that can generate ANY piece of source code, but it absolutely is possible to create a tool that can generate useful code to address a wide variety of different requirements, and that’s what CodeGen does.

So just what is CodeGen? Well, I generally describe it as a “template-driven” code generator. What that means is that you start with a template file that defines the general “rules” for the code that is to be created, and you combine the information from that template file with some meta-data in order to produce the final code. So now the question is where does the meta-data come from? Well, when using CodeGen, in most cases it comes from a Synergy repository.

A repository database is an extremely rich source of meta-data relating to the data structures that are used within your applications. The applications that we write totally revolve around data, they create data, update data, and analyze and present data. So having a repository which completely describes not only the data structures that your application uses, but also a huge amount of additional information about HOW that data is represented and to processed, and armed with an API (ddlib) which allows programmatic access to that meta-data, a programmer can create software that “does things” based on that information. That’s what CodeGen does.

By the way, don’t fret it if you don’t already use Repository … that’s easy to address.

I have no intention of “rambling on” about what CodeGen is and how it works, because that information is all available elsewhere. CodeGen has been in use for several years, I use it extensively, and I have used it to deliver real value to several customers also. In fact in the past, that was the model. CodeGen was a tool developed by Synergex Professional Services Group, and it was available for us to use during consulting engagements. If we used it during such an engagement then that customer got to continue to use the tool, and many have done so.

The real point of writing this post is to announce, with great delight, “that times are a changing”. We’ve decided to take a different tack, and make CodeGen available to a wider audience; a MUCH wider audience. I am delighted to announce that CodeGen is now an Open Source product, and is published for the world to download and use. The project is hosted on CodePlex (Microsoft’s Open Source hosting platform) and you can view the CodeGen project home page at https://codegen.codeplex.com.

So just what does this mean? Well, it means that CodeGen is now available for you to download and use, and I hope that lots of you do just that. CodeGen is now primarily developed with Synergy .NET in Visual Studio, and if you want to use it you have two choices:

  1. Download the pre-built distribution (a Windows Installer setup program).
  2. Download the source code package and build it yourself.

The binary distribution is built with the latest version of Synergy.NET (9.5.3b), so you’ll need that version of Synergy to use it. If you’re working with an older version of Synergy then you’ll need to build CodeGen from source code, but you’ll still need a pretty recent version of Synergy/DE.

Even though the main development environment for CodeGen is now Synergy .NET, it wasn’t always that way. CodeGen started out life as a regular “Traditional Synergy” application, and it still works just fine that way. What that means is that CodeGen is equally at home under Synergy .NET or Traditional Synergy on Windows, Unix, Linux or OpenVMS, and the source code download includes scripts to build CodeGen on all of these platforms.

If you are currently attending the Synergex DevPartner Conference in Chicago, IL then you’re going to hear more about CodeGen during the conference today, and on Tuesday afternoon there will be a hands-on tutorial available to help you get real experience working with it. And if you’re attending the conference in York, England in June then don’t fret, you’ll get the same opportunity. But if you’re not attending either conference (it’s not too late to sign up for York) then you’re definitely missing out on some great information about CodeGen, and a BUNCH of other cool stuff!

But just because you’re not attending the conference doesn’t mean that you can’t use CodeGen. Head on over to https://codegen.codeplex.com to get started right now. And please, even if you don’t use CodeGen right now, at least “follow” the CodePlex project so that you’ll be kept up to date with news about the product.

By the way, to my best of my knowledge this is the first time that a “DIBOL” (Synergy) application has been published as an open source project, and I’m pretty stoked about that. BUT … there’s more! There’s another open source Synergy project about to “hit the streets” … and it utilizes CodeGen … but I’ll leave it up to my friend and colleague Richard Morris to tell you all about that!


Are you ready for Windows 8 and Visual Studio “11”?

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 15, 2012 at 10:59 pm

Steve Ives

Microsoft has recently announced that the Release Candidates of both Windows 8 and Visual Studio “11” will be made available during the first week of June, 2012. Are your applications ready?

The annual Synergex DevPartner Conferences are just around the corner, and will present a wealth of valuable information that Synergy developers need to be aware of in order to deploy apps on these new platforms. It’s not too late to sign up, so don’t miss the opportunity.


Windows 8 First Impressions.

By , Posted on March 27, 2012 at 1:41 pm

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Although I’ve seen the latest offerings from Microsoft in the Windows OS stakes, I must say it’s a real eye opener to see it presented – and by non-Microsoft people!  It is conference time again for me, both preparing my sessions for the upcoming DevPartner Conferences in Chicago and York, and attending Dev Week in London.  This is my third year at this conference and I use the presentations here to spring board ideas into my conference sessions.

Anyone keeping abreast of the OS news from Microsoft will no doubt know there is a new OS on the block – Windows 8.   The new OS has, of course, a new UI. First impressions are that it is a combination Windows Mobile and Xbox!  Thankfully there is also a standard desktop environment as well, which for those of us without touch screen enabled laptops (note to boss, need new slate device :)) is good news.  Don’t get me wrong, the new interface is great, but as I’m swiping along and hunting for the back button I have a tendency to be up on my feet waving my hands erratically – well that’s what I have to do to get my Kinect to respond, and I did say it’s like the Xbox!

Joking aside (why?) it’s rather important to understand that Windows 8 has a new interface, and not a single application you have running under Windows (7/XP, etc.) will run under this new environment.  Now before you all start to panic, I did say there is a Windows desktop environment, and it’s under this that all your Synergy based applications will run. Panic over then.  All you need to do is install and go – click the start button and you are away.  So where has the program “start” button gone?  Disappeared, it is no longer, vanished!  All your programs will start from the new Windows 8 swishing tile start page.  If you have a lot of programs hanging off start button sub-menus then these will all appear as individual tiles on your new start page, which may be an installation consideration.  The desktop appears to work just nicely, and it’s where all of the traditional style applications are executed within, complete with all their associated Chrome (the windows, ribbon menus, buttons, etc.)  There are, of course, new or updated programs that utilise the new design architecture, Metro.  Metro is a new style of program UX (user experience).  Metro takes a while to get used to, but if you’ve been swishing through Xbox programs like LoveFilm, or the new BBC iPlayer app, you’ll be well versed in the navigation techniques of Metro styled programs.

It’s interesting that even the Microsoft people at his conference have no idea (or are not able to say) when Windows 8 will be officially released, but it’s most likely no time soon.

One great bit of news is that Metro is built on XAML – just like the WPF desktop developments I’ve been promoting for some years now.  Also, for those utilising my single page Visual State Managed design then this is the same approach used by Metro – well done MicrosoftJ

Now, I wonder if there will be any fancy data driven, Metro styled, slate device based, live & interactive demos at this year’s DevPartner conference – see “note to boss” above.  Check out the conference agenda (http://conference.synergex.com/) and make sure you have your seat booked to find out!


Synergy/DE to sim-ship with Visual Studio 11 Beta

By Roger Andrews, Posted on February 27, 2012 at 10:43 am

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We have been working hard at Synergex since Microsoft’s BUILD conference last Fall ensuring that Synergy works well with the soon-to-be-released Visual Studio 11 and .NET Framework 4.5 beta.

I am pleased to tell you that we will sim-ship with Microsoft on their announced February 29 beta release date with a released version of Synergy/DE 9.5.3a to allow those of you interested to test drive the new release. Synergex customers can expect to see performance improvements in editing – especially when using large Synergy Language source files – among other improvements.

You can find more information on these Microsoft blogs:

Visual Studio Blog
Jason Zanders Weblog


Using WCF Services in Synergy .NET Applications

By Steve Ives, Posted on January 11, 2012 at 2:37 pm

Steve Ives

Apparently there are some people actually reading this BLOG!!! And … it turns out that quite a few of them have been working through my earlier series of posts related to using WCF. Excellent!

It occurred to me that since I wrote the last of those articles we have had a release of a new version, namely Synergy/DE 9.5.3. And that new version included some important new functionality related to consuming WCF services in Synergy .NET applications.

In previous posts I had to talk about the fact that “Add Service Reference” was not implemented in Synergy .NET, and I demonstrated how you could use the svcutil.exe command line utility to generate client proxy code and configuration information, both of which could then be manually added to a Synergy .NET project.

Good news … in 9.5.3 the Add Service Reference wizard has been implemented in all Synergy project types. I’m not going to go into great detail about how to use this new functionality … because it’s exactly the same as in C# and VB projects, and pretty well documented elsewhere. But briefly, in a Synergy .NET project:

1. Right-click on the project in solution explorer and select “Add Service Reference”.

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2. Enter the URI of your service and click the “Go” button … or … if the service is in the same solution, click the “Discover” button.

3. Enter the name of the namespace that you wish the generated proxy classes to be placed in.

4. Optionally click the “Advanced…” button and select advanced options. For example, it is common to set “Collection Type” to something a little nicer than System.Array, and very often you’ll want to enable “Generate asynchronous operations” in order to help you build responsive and flexible applications.

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5. Finally click the “OK” button in the first dialog to generate the service reference within your project.

imageWhen you add a service reference to a project, several things happen:

  • The svcutil.exe utility is used to download the WSDL information from the service, and to generate client proxy classes for the service based on the content of the WSDL.
  • The resulting generated files are added into the project. By default these files are hidden beneath a single node in Solution explorer which represents the service reference, but you can look at all of the files by enabling the “Show All Files” option in solution explorer.
  • Depending on the type of project you are working in, references to several additional assemblies may be added. These referenced assemblies can include System.Runtime.Serialization, System.ServiceModel, and System.Xml.

So … finally … no more manual use of svcutil.exe is required in order to consume WCF services Synergy .NET applications. Thanks development Smile.


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