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Microsoft Make Xamarin Tools Free

By Steve Ives, Posted on March 31, 2016 at 8:49 am

One of the big news items from today’s Keynote at the Microsoft Build conference is that the Xamarin tools, which allow .NET developers to create fully native apps for the iOS, Android and Windows Universal platforms with a single code base, will in future be bundled for free with Visual Studio. Microsoft purchased Xamarin in February 2016 and since then a lot of developers have been waiting with baited breath to find out what would change, and now we know. Exciting news if you want to develop mobile applications.


Microsoft Release Visual Studio 2015 Update 2

By Steve Ives, Posted on March 30, 2016 at 10:25 pm

Today, amongst many other things, Microsoft announced the release of Visual Studio 2015 Update 2. We wanted to let you know that if you are doing Synergy .NET development with the current Synergy 10.3.2 beta version then it’s OK to apply Update 2. But if you’re running the 10.3.1 release of Synergy (or an earlier version) you should not install Update 2 just yet. We are currently finalizing and will soon release a hotfix for Synergy 10.3.1 to that will add support for Visual Studio 2015 Update 2, but for now you should stick with Update 1.


PDF API Enhancements

By Steve Ives, Posted on March 28, 2016 at 1:38 pm

Last year I announced that we had created a new PDF API and made it available via the CodeExchange in the Synergy/DE Resource Center. Now I am pleased to announce that we have made some enhancements to the original API, namely by adding the ability to:

  • View existing PDF documents (Windows only).
  • Print existing PDF documents (Windows only).
  • Draw circles.
  • Draw pie charts.
  • Draw bar charts (with a single or multiple data series).

Here’s an example of a pie chart that was drawn with the new API:

PieChart

Here’s an example of a bar chart:

BarChart

And here’s an example of a multi-series bar chart:

MultiBarChart

It’s early days for the support of charts, and I plan to make several additional enhancements as time permits, but I wanted to make the work that has been done so far out into the wild, and hopefully get some feedback to help me decide what else needs to be done.

If you’re interested in learning how to use the PDF API then I’ll be presenting a session that will teach you all about it at our up-coming DevPartner conference in May. So if you haven’t already done so, head on over to http://conference.synergex.com to reserve your spot at the conference now.


Covers? Better than the original?

By Richard Morris, Posted on March 21, 2016 at 9:51 am

I’m sometimes sceptical when somebody covers a song I know and love as I’m worried that their version may not bring with it the true spirit of the original track. If it’s not done right it just won’t be pleasing to the ear, and music should always invoke passion. When customers ask us to demonstrate how to put a new User Interface over an existing program I’m always conscious that our “cover” needs to retain the proven logic of the original program while offering the user a new and pleasing, easy to use and navigate, user experience.

In recent weeks I’ve been developing the Symphony UI Toolkit, which as the name suggests, helps you to migrate your Traditional Synergy UI Toolkit programs to a modern Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) based UI. This new member to the Symphony ensemble provides a number of simple techniques for connecting between the WPF UI and the existing “event” driven DBL code.

One recent engagement where I utilise the whole Symphony Framework, including the new Symphony UI Toolkit, was to add a modern UI to an existing UI Toolkit program. The basic solution was to write the new UI in Synergy .NET using XAML for the UI components. Then host this in the existing Toolkit program using the DOTNET API. We started off with:

old

The program presented a list of items from which the user could select from. Other than the slightly dated look and feel the main problem with the application was that the user was restricted to seeing only the information on a single tab page at a time. The brief for the new UI was simple – make the pages dock-able.

Utilizing a number of core features within the Infragistics UI control set I was able to retain all the logic from the original program and bring a fresh new UI to the user:

new

Now as the user navigated the main list of items, while the docked panels display the relevant information. The grid provided the required filtering and grouping capabilities and selecting an item changed the fields on the input panels to edit mode so changes and additions could be made.

The Microsoft styled ribbon control replaced the traditional menu columns and button toolbar. Additional options were made available within an Outlook style navigation bar – which can be hidden with a single click.

The original program code was modified in a way that we can swap between running the traditional UI Toolkit UI and the new WPF UI by changing a single setting in the synergy.ini configuration file:

ini

Although targeting the UI Toolkit the steps involved in migrating to a new WPF UI with the Symphony Framework will work just as well with almost any style of DBL program, and you can try it for yourself at DevPartner 2016. Join me in the recording studio for the Monday pre-conference workshop where together we’ll make a great new cover version of an old Toolkit program. The day will start relaxed as you write code to handle menu, toolbar and button commands. Then we’ll up the tempo and you’ll code event handlers to execute list load methods. Then we’ll jazz things up a little handling change methods and field validation. By the end of the day we’ll have a number 1 hit on our laptops.


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