Phone800.366.3472 SupportGet Support DocumentationDocumentation Resource CenterResource Center
search
close
Open Menu

Synergex Blog


Virtual Reality: How We Successfully Pulled Off Our First Remote Conference

By Liz Wilson and Heather Sula, Posted on July 27, 2021 at 11:20 am

Liz Wilson and Heather Sula

March 2020. We were three months away from the Synergy DevPartner Conference, an in-person learning event we hold for our customers every 18 months. Then the pandemic hit and upended everything. We had no idea that within a year, we’d have to completely reconceptualize and adapt our entire conference blueprint for a virtual audience while providing the same educational value and keeping the communal spirit of our in-person gatherings.

In the end, we were able to present 16 content-packed virtual sessions to a record number of attendees that, thanks to a boatload of planning and persistence, went off with barely a hitch. (You can watch most of the conference sessions here.)

Conference moderator Haley Hart and subject matter expert Marty Lewis lead a Q&A after a session.

Here’s how we did it.

Planning

Planning any large event is a significant logistical undertaking, requiring coordination and cooperation between multiple departments. The more you plan ahead, the less you have to panic at conference time. We won’t bore you with every detail of our particular planning process, but here are some foundational steps we took to make sure all our bases were covered.

What we did:

  • Held weekly conference check-ins. Communication is key for making sure nothing falls through the cracks.
  • Created standard branding. The conference had its own “look” that was used to design the website, PowerPoint templates, webinar rooms, session landing pages, etc., to ensure a cohesive aesthetic that distinguished it from our usual content.
  • Got organized. Whether it was shared spreadsheets, Kanban boards, etc., we made sure the key players had insight into the necessary tasks and timelines, so no one was in the dark.
  • Allowed time to work on “nice-to-haves” (informal networking sessions, giveaways, etc.) in addition to the necessary components of the conference. Sometimes it’s the little things that make an event special.

Additional Takeaway: Hold a pre-mortem. A pre-mortem is a thought experiment that encourages people to think about what could go wrong. A few members of the conference planning committee got together in April and did some brainstorming about specific issues that could arise during the conference. For example, we determined who would step in as moderator if either of our two main MCs called in sick. Or, if the Q&A portion of a session went on for longer than expected, we came up with a solution: unanswered questions would be collected and answered during the wrap-up session. Thankfully, no one wound up getting sick, but it was comforting to know we had a plan in case that did happen.

Execution

While planning is nine-tenths of the game, you still have to execute. The following are some things to keep in mind so everything goes smoothly when the time comes.

What we did:

  • Created a task force to handle registrant issues that communicated frequently. Because we had additional people on hand to field customer support, the organizers were free to focus on making the conference happen.
  • Kept an eye on statistics. We sent analytics to our sales team after every session so they could reach out to customers accordingly.

Additional Takeaway: Talking to a camera instead of an audience is…weird. Pre-recording most of the sessions was helpful for a handful of reasons: it allowed presenters to take a substantial breather between slides (grab a cup of coffee, get the demo ready without rushing), and we had the opportunity to add some creative flourishes in post-production. Still, most presenters found the camera to be a poor substitute for a live audience. In the future, we’ll consider inviting additional staff to recordings to act as a stand-in audience.

Session recording in our makeshift conference studio at Synergex HQ.

Flexibility

Ultimately, you have to be nimble, ready to adapt to changing circumstances, and take on any challenges that pop up. Luckily, you can prepare for flexibility too.

What we did:

  • Backups, backups, backups. For pre-recorded sessions, the main plan was to upload the files into the webinar platform and hit play. But we always had a backup plan in case something went wrong (private YouTube video versions of the sessions we could link to, etc.).

Additional Takeaway: You don’t need to use a one-size-fits-all formula for conference sessions. We had to work around several factors when recording the 16 sessions, including each presenter’s geographic location and level of comfort in a live vs. pre-recorded context. Rather than make everyone do everything the same way, we gave presenters flexibility in terms of how they wanted to structure and lead their sessions, and we wound up with a nice variety because of it.

We look forward to seeing you at the 2022 conference!

Check out the conference sessions and learn how to do the following:

  • Improve development productivity and practices through adopting more efficient development methodologies.
  • Enhance years of Synergy data and code with new technologies, enabling connectivity through RESTful web services and APIs.
  • Keep up to date with Synergy SSL and operating system security patches. (Security and disaster recovery are important for compliance!)
  • Use traditional Synergy in Visual Studio to gain a huge productivity boost, lower the barrier to continuous code integration, and improve processes and software quality.

Watch sessions here


5 Strategies for Creating Educational Content that Customers Will Use

By Heather Sula and Jacklin Garcia, Posted on October 22, 2020 at 3:05 pm

Heather Sula and Jacklin Garcia

The scenario: You and your team of fellow genius software developers have created a great application. It’s been out in the wild with customers using it and loving it, but they have questions and aren’t quite getting what they need from your documentation and release notes, and your support team is always bogged down with the same questions. So how can you educate your customers to help them get the most out of your product?

Talk to Support

As a developer, you have strong ideas about how people should be using your product. However, people are people, and they’re going to take what’s in front of them and do all kinds of things you never expected. That’s where your support team comes in. (Note: If you’re with a small company and you ARE the support team, find a way to keep track of this stuff, if you’re not already.) Support is on the front lines—they’re an infinite well of knowledge when it comes to the ways people are actually using your products and their problem areas. If your support reps are using some sort of case management system (we use Salesforce Service Cloud), they can easily pull reports of bugs reported or questions asked by product or release version to get you the information you need quickly. Plus, if you can convince support that these educational resources mean people will be able to do “self-serve” support and free up more of their time, they’ll be more than happy to get you whatever you need. You can find out how helpful the Synergex support team is here

Get ideas straight from the source

Another avenue for figuring out your customers’ pain points is hearing directly from them, and there are a number of ways to do this. The most direct, of course, is the good old-fashioned direct conversation. Are you or your sales team reaching out to customers with any sort of frequency to see how they’re doing? You’d be surprised what a 15-minute conversation or direct email exchange can uncover. 
You can also create places for people to provide this information directly. Two ways to do this are surveys (some people loooove to give feedback) or a forum where customers can post their thoughts, ideas, and issues with your product. At Synergex, the latter is our Resource Center, and customers use it to air their thoughts and curate their wish list for new product features.

Work with Marketing

Now that you know the “What”—what questions you need to answer and what topics your customers are interested in—you need the “How.” That’s where marketing comes in. If your company has a marketing team, you may see them as the people who sometimes send out emails or edit your website, but marketing can be a valuable resource from the very beginning of this process through the end. They can help you create surveys, advertise your forum, or help create other ways for you to reach out to customers. They may bring a different perspective to help you identify useful areas of focus. They can put their creative powers to use, helping you create and brand your content. And, more importantly, they can help you get your educational product out there (more about that later). Feel free to pick our brains if you have questions.

Make it digestible, accessible, and fun

Sure, you have the dry (though they don’t need to be), dependable resources that come standard with software development: release notes, documentation, etc. But you’re a creature of the internet—you know how short attention spans are, even for detail-oriented, technical people like yourself. Plus, people learn in different ways, AND they need to hear the info multiple times before it sinks in, so providing information about your products in various formats can help accommodate those different learning styles. What you need is content that’s simple and quick to digest. 

Here are a few things we’ve had success with at Synergex:

YouTube videos/tutorials

Videos can be an extremely useful tool when wielded well. They’re a constant resource that your customers can revisit again and again, and they can save you and support from having to answer the same questions over and over and over again by simply linking to a video.

Cheat Sheets

At our company, we provide “cheat sheets” to our customers upon request—visually pleasing, easily readable single- or two-sided documents that contain commonly used statements or shortcuts our customers can use when building their product with our code. Materials like cheat sheets let customers feel like they’re in on a secret (which they are!) and like they’re getting more bang for their buck.

Webinars

Webinars are a great way to promote an idea or product you’d like your customers to know about, while also being a great educational resource for some of the more niche topics your customer may be curious about.

Accessibility

Have all of this information easily findable on your website. It would suck to spend all this time creating content only for people never to find it. We’ve made an effort to move most of our helpful content out into the open, like our Answers and Ideas forums, so you can see it without having to log into the Resource Center. Our KnowledgeBase will be the next component that we move from behind the curtain. Watch for an announcement about this soon. Bonus: If you have more information readily available, it lowers the adoption barrier for potential new customers. People are more likely to pull the trigger on a purchase if they see that you’re engaged and customer oriented with useful, easily accessible information about your product.

Cross-referencing

Remember how we said you need to repeat information multiple times before people retain it? One way to do that is to employ cross-referencing. You can link to your resources from other resources to reinforce your messages. For example, our quarterly Synergy-e-News newsletter links to blog posts and technical articles that we may have only promoted once but want to emphasize. And those tech articles and blog posts often link to our documentation, videos, tutorials, etc. Give your customers every opportunity to find your content by putting it in front of them more than once.

Fun

This stuff does NOT have to be as dry as your documentation (though we’ve been known to sneak in a few surprises there too). Have some fun with your educational materials, be informal, show you’re human. Your customers will have more fun too and potentially retain more.

Let people know about it

This is, again, where you may need to collaborate with your marketing team. They have all kinds of ideas and resources for getting information out to your customers (and potential customers), from emails, to ad campaigns, to social media, to website optimization, to standardized email signatures with links to resources, and more. AND they can make it aesthetically pleasing—never underestimate the appeal of content that looks, well, appealing. Find creative ways to let your customers know about all the great stuff you have for them, and they’ll be happier for it. 

What strategies do you use to educate your customers?

Education: It’s not just for customers

While this post focuses on external resources for customers, internal training and educational materials for employees are important too! Not sure how to start creating internal training materials for your developers or support representatives? Contact your Synergex account manager to learn about setting up a system assessment with our consulting department as a first step – our system assessments provide a documented architectural overview of your application, touching on relevant aspects of your overall business, which you can then turn around and use for your internal onboarding. 

Bottom line: get creative and collaborate. 


Highlights from the 2018 Synergy DevPartner Conference

By Heather Sula, Posted on January 14, 2019 at 3:26 pm

Heather Sula

As we head into 2019, we reflect back on one of our favorite events of the year: the 2018 Synergy DevPartner Conference in New Orleans.

Packed with sessions on topics ranging from modern and agile development practices to RESTful web services to QA and learning culture, not to mention an engaging and illuminating keynote presentation from Microsoft’s Donovan Brown, the conference offered a plethora of info, ideas, tips, tricks, and plans for the future. Case studies and customer demos provided insight into practical implementations of technical concepts, and we were jazzed to introduce our new open source RESTful web services project, Harmony Core. Bourbon Street wasn’t too bad either! The legendary food, music, and culture of one of America’s most historic cities provided a great backdrop to a fun and productive week.

Here are some key takeaways from the conference:

  • Improve your productivity and practices by adopting more efficient development methodologies.
  • Enhance years of Synergy data and code with new technologies, including enabling connectivity through RESTful web services.
  • Security and disaster recovery are important for compliance—stay up to date with Synergy SSL and operating system security patches.
  • Use traditional Synergy in Visual Studio (it’s not as hard as it seems!) to significantly boost productivity, lower the barrier to continuous code integration, and improve your processes and software quality.
  • Move to the cloud. Developing and running your Synergy application in the cloud is relatively easy and provides a convenient path to expand your infrastructure to meet demands.
  • Education in the workplace is important—create an onboarding program that includes presentations, videos, and discussion.

The Synergex team came back to the office energized and ready to implement big plans for Synergy in the new year. We look forward to seeing you at the 2020 conference!

You can check out videos and slides of conference sessions here.

(more…)


Don't miss a post!

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Recent Posts Categories Tag Cloud Archives