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Synergex Developer Support Has Your Back—Now More than Ever

By Jacklin Garcia, Posted on January 27, 2021 at 11:33 am

Jacklin Garcia

Have you noticed some new names popping up on email signatures from Synergex Support or perhaps a new voice picking up our phones? Have you seen some number patterns appearing in email subject lines related to your cases? Over the last year we’ve made a lot of changes to our Developer Support department to address succession planning and feedback from customer surveys and to improve response times on your cases. We’d love to share a bit of what’s new with you, so you know what to expect the next time you send a case to Support.

Putting names (and faces) with the voices

As many of you know, our longtime Support Manager, Beth Ives, retired at the end of last year. That left some big shoes to fill, and I’m grateful to the whole Synergex team for helping me transition into the role of manager for both our Developer Support and Education teams over the last year. The rest of the Developer Support team members that you’ve grown to know and love are still here and are as reliable and knowledgeable as ever. The more tenured members of the team have been great mentors to our two newest developer support engineers, Matthew Nix and Mike Carleson. Mike and Matthew started with the team back in October of 2020 and are initially focusing on licensing, installation, and traditional Synergy cases. They are especially eager to answer any questions you may have about REV11 licensing as you upgrade your production subscription licenses this year. I’m very excited to have combined the Education team with the powerhouse of Synergy knowledge that is the Synergex Developer Support team. Expect to see some exciting new joint initiatives over the next few years.

Beth Ives’ final team meeting. She is already missed.

Improvements to support case flows

As a team, we’ve identified a few of our policies and procedures that we’d like to update to give you the best experience possible. Many of these changes will take place behind the scenes internally, but you may have already noticed one change. Previously, emailed cases were logged manually by a developer support engineer in our support service desk (we use Salesforce Service Cloud). We knew we could automate this process to ideally result in faster case assignment and initial response from a developer support engineer. We did a soft launch of a feature called Email-to-Case, which uses a reference code in an email to determine which case that email belongs to and logs the interaction accordingly. The strange characters you may have recently seen appended to email subjects are the reference codes. We plan to do a wider launch of this feature next month. You should start to receive notifications that a case was created right after you email a question to Synergex Developer Support. These notification emails will contain your case number and unique reference code. If you need to start a new email thread for an existing case, we ask that you add the reference code to the subject to help us keep the system tidy and keep your case moving forward as smoothly as possible.

Tell us what you think!

When a developer support engineer closes a case, you should receive an automated email from our service desk. These emails often include links to surveys asking for your feedback on the case. We really want to hear from you! These surveys are quick, and your feedback is what will drive internal training and additional process improvements for the Support department. Please take a few moments to fill out the case closure survey the next time one makes it into your inbox. To sweeten the deal, we will enter all survey respondents into a drawing each quarter for a $50 gift card!

What does Support do?

In case you’re not a power user of Synergex Support services yet, I’ll fill you in. First, we strive to make it as easy as possible for you to get in touch with us. You can reach Synergex Developer Support by email (support@synergex.com) from 6am – 5pm Pacific. We are available for phone support (800.366.3472 toll-free US and Canada or +1.916.635.7300 all others) from 7am – 5pm Pacific. You can also submit cases through the Resource Center (log-in required). Our department can answer questions that range from “Will version 11 of Synergy work on my operating system?” to “How do I declare this in .NET?” The team can help you with questions regarding migrations to new versions of Synergy, moving your development environment to Visual Studio, configuring REV11 licensing, and more. We’re also always happy to point you to additional educational materials (e.g., documentation, training videos, code samples, etc.).

An unlimited number of Support contacts are included in your DevPartner subscription, and ad hoc support is available for those not on a subscription yet. To hear about our premier support offerings, contact your account executive. We look forward to working your next case with Synergex Developer Support!


CodeGen 5.6.5 Released

By Steve Ives, Posted on January 24, 2021 at 11:13 pm

Steve Ives

I am pleased to announce the release of a new version of CodeGen, and this release is quite a big one. The changes include the following:

This version of CodeGen was built with Synergy/DE 11.1.1f and requires a minimum of version 10.1.1 to operate.

We recommend that all CodeGen users upgrade to this version, particularly if you are doing Harmony Core development. You can download the new version from GitHub.


10 Tips for Faster Synergy Development in Visual Studio

By Phil Bratt, Posted on January 21, 2021 at 2:12 pm

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Visual Studio is consistently one of the highest trending IDEs on the market. It has powerful features to increase code productivity. Because of this, Synergex brought traditional Synergy coding into Visual Studio. But how do you use it? I would like to focus on some of the hotkeys and organizational features available inside Visual Studio that will help developers navigate their code.

Editing Code

  1. Easy commenting: While testing code, there are times when you want to disable large sections of code so that you can run alternative code to see the differences. In Visual Studio, you can highlight the code you want to comment out and press CTRL K + C to comment out the lines. You can press this key combination multiple times to add a ‘;’ to the front of each line or CTRL K + U to remove a comment character from each line. The toolbar also contains buttons to comment and uncomment lines:
  2. Multiple line edits: One of my favorite features in Visual Studio that I’m surprised hasn’t made its way into other Microsoft products is the ability to edit multiple lines at once. If you press ALT + SHIFT and (while still holding them) push the UP or DOWN arrow keys, you can expand the cursor to multiple lines. This means that when you press a key, it will edit all of those lines with that key stroke. For example, let’s say you have multiple WRITES statements in your code:
    writes(chnout, rec_1)     
    writes(chnout, " ")
    writes(chnout, rec_2)
  3. Now you want to add an error list to handle record locking on each line. Well, you can use ALT + SHIFT to add the identical error list to each line, which beats copying and pasting to each line.

    writes(chnout, rec_1)       [$ERR_LOCKED=errloc]     
    writes(chnout, " ")         [$ERR_LOCKED=errloc]
    writes(chnout, rec_2)       [$ERR_LOCKED=errloc]
  1. Simple duplication: Speaking of copy and paste, how annoying is it to click, then hold SHIFT, then END, then CRTL C, then click, and then CTRL V? That’s tedious. It was tedious to write it out. If you want to copy the line you are on, you can duplicate the line of code with CTRL D.

Collapsing and expanding code

You may have noticed that when you create a main routine, subroutine, or function, a “-“ appears to the left of the editor. This allows you to collapse that code section to make it easier to edit large pieces of code.

  1. Collapsible labels: You will also notice that internal subroutines/labels are not naturally collapsible. But what if you wanted to make a label collapsible because you have so many of them? You would surround the code with .REGION/.ENDREGION along with a title for the region. (I usually stick with the name of the label.) For example:
    .region "erroloc"
    errloc,
    repeat
    begin
    ...
    .endregion

With .REGION/.ENDREGION in place, you will now get the “-“ around that section that you can collapse.

  1. Hotkeys: A number of hotkeys can be used to collapse and expand these sections:

Toggle outlining expansion – CTRL M + M
Toggle all outlining – CRTL M + L
Stop outlining – CRTL M + P
Stop hiding current – CRTL M + U
Collapse to definitions – CTRL M + O

Navigating code

There are also a few features that can be used to navigate your code that I find extremely helpful:

  1. If you are on a BEGIN or END in code and want to go to the matching END or BEGIN, while the cursor is on the BEGIN or END, press CRTL ] to move the cursor to its pairing statement.
  2. If you are on a variable or subroutine and want to jump to where it is defined in the code, you can either press F12 or right-click and select “Go to definition.”
  3. With this jumping around, you can also push CTRL – to go back to where you were or CTRL + to go forward.

Debugging code

To round off this list, there are a number of function keys that are useful during a debugging session in Visual Studio:

  1. To step into the line of code you are on, so you can see the code run through a subroutine, class, etc., use F11. To step over and go to the next line of the currently executing source code, press F10.
  2. While coding or debugging, pressing F9 will toggle adding or removing a breakpoint on the current line.

Those are my 10 tips for navigating through Visual Studio and making use of its code editing and hotkey features. You can also find our video about Visual Studio hotkeys here. Keep in mind that most of these keys can be changed or customized inside Visual Studio by selecting Options from the Tools drop-down menu. Hope you found some of these helpful.

If you haven’t moved your Synergy development environment to Visual Studio yet, what are you waiting for? Check out our solution for modernizing your development environment and accessing a superior debugging and build experience. You can also reach out to your account executive to discuss how we can help you move to Visual Studio or train your developers to get the most out of their new environment.


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