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What’s on the menu today?

By Richard Morris, Posted on April 6, 2016 at 5:51 am

Menu processing is a fundamental requirement in any UI Toolkit program. Without menu columns and entries your program would not function. You also signal menu events from toolbars, and buttons placed on windows and lists. Once a menu entry of any sort is fired, even if it’s signalled from within the DBL code, there is usually a using statement that dispatches to the required segment of logic. When configuring a new Windows Presentation Foundation UI this technique is still valid.

The Symphony Framework UI Toolkit assists the developer to bridge the connection between the DBL host program and the commands associated with menu bars, toolbar, and buttons – basically any WPF control that can bind to a command, and that includes selecting an item within a data grid!

Before we head into how the Symphony Framework UI Toolkit helps let’s first look at some simple UI Toolkit script and code snippets. Firstly we can create menu entries in scripts:

m1

Here we have a menu column called “mfile” with an entry called “f_new”. The important element is the entry name “f_new” as this is the menu signal name that is used within the DBL code. You can create toolbars in code that will signal a menu event, for example:

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Here we have the same menu event name of “f_new” being signalled when the toolbar button is selected. We can also add buttons to tab containers;

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Windows and lists can also have buttons added to them both in scrip and in code;

m4 m5

If we need to enable or disable the “f_new” capability within the UI Toolkit application we need to do this for all instances, for example;

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The Symphony Framework UI Toolkit removes the verbosity of this structure of programming while retaining the same logical concept. Using the Symphony.UIToolkit.Menu.MenuController class allows you to create a command;

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Now we have the command we can bind it to any WPF control that accepts a command binding. So for a menu;

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We can utilise the same command on, for example, an Infragistics ribbon control;

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Using a regular tool bar;

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And of course as a regular button on an input form or data grid view;

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In the host DBL code we can now simplify the control of the commands. By enabling the single command it changes the executable status of the all UI controls that it is bound to;

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When the command is executed the toolkit menu entry is signalled to the host program. We need to define an event handler;

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This is a code snippet and not the complete event handler code:

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This code is setting up the required menu entry name and then calling into the host DBL code to process the menu select. In the host program we need to ensure that we dispatch to the menu processing code segment. In this example the original toolkit code was processing an input form. We continue to process the input window using the i_input() routine if the toolkit is still the active environment. If we are running using the new WPF UI then we simple process the menu event;

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We shall be covering menu, toolbar and command processing during the DevPartner 2016 pre-conference workshop as we all migrate an existing UI Toolkit program to a modern WPF user interface.

 


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