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Preparing for Windows Phone 7

By Steve Ives, Posted on June 10, 2010 at 7:59 pm

Steve Ives

By Steve Ives, Senior Consultant, Synergex Professional Services Group

Later this year, probably, Microsoft are releasing a new version of their phone operating system, and it’s going to be a BIG change for developers who have created applications for the earlier Windows Mobile operating systems. The new O/S is called “Windows Phone 7”, and although under the covers it’s really still Windows CE, on the surface things will look VERY different.

Perhaps the largest single change will be the user interface of Windows Phone 7 devices, which will be entirely driven by Microsoft Silverlight. That’s potentially great news for existing Silverlight or WPF developers, but will of course mean a total re-write of the UI for developers with existing applications which were essentially based on a subset of Windows Forms.

Using Silverlight will mean that we can expect some dazzling UI from applications, and indeed the O/S and the standard applications provided with it already look pretty cool, but there will definitely be a learning curve for anyone who has not developed Silverlight applications before.

Part of the good news is that the basic tools that you need to develop Windows Phone 7 applications are free. You can download Visual Studio Express Phone Edition and have pretty much what you need to develop applications. At the time of writing though, these tools are in a “pre-beta” form, and as such you can probably expect some issues, and need to update the tools pretty regularly.

There is, in my humble opinion at least, also some bad news, not least of which is that Microsoft seem to have turned the Windows Phone platform into, essentially, another iPhone! While developers can use free development tools (or full versions of Visual Studio) to create their applications (just like with the iPhone) they will have to sign up for a $99 annual “Windows Phone Developer “subscription in order to have the ability to deploy their application to their physical phone for testing (just like with the iPhone).

It will no longer be possible to deploy applications via “CAB file” installations, in fact for anything other than developer testing, the ONLY way to get an application onto a Windows 7 Phone will be via the Microsoft “Windows Phone Marketplace” (just like with the iPhone). When a developer publishes an application to the marketplace they can chose whether the application is free, or is to be charged for. With iPhone development developers can submit an unlimited number of free applications, and many do. With Windows Phone 7, developers can only submit five free applications, and after that there will be a charge to submit further free applications. If an application is submitted for sale, Microsoft will take a 30% cut of any proceeds (just like with the iPhone).

Applications submitted for inclusion in the marketplace will be subject to “testing and approval” by Microsoft (just like iPhone apps), and apps may be rejected if they don’t meet the guidelines set by Microsoft (just like with iPhone apps). This inevitably means that some types of applications won’t be allowed. For example, with the iPhone it is not possible (in the US at least) to use “tethering” to enable you to plug your iPhone into your laptop in order to access the Internet via the cell phone network, and I would imagine we’re now going to see similar restrictions on Windows 7 Phone applications.

iPhone applications execute in a very strictly defined sandbox, and while this does afford a lot of protection for the platform (because, for example, one application can in no way interact with the data of another application), it can also seriously limit what applications can do. For example, on the iPhone it is not possible to save an email attachment (say a PDF file) and subsequently open that PDF file in another application, Acrobat Reader for example. While I understand the protections offered by the sandbox approach, as a user of the device I feel that it restricts too far what I can do with the device. The Windows Phone 7 platform is essentially exactly the same.

Other restrictions in the Windows Phone 7 platform that developers will have to come to terms with are:

  • No access to TCP/IP sockets
  • No access to Bluetooth communication
  • No access to USB connections to a host computer
  • No Windows Forms UI’s
  • No SQL Express access
  • No ability to execute native code via pinvoke (except device drivers, which must be approved by Microsoft)
  • No customization of O/S features (e.g. no alternate phone dialers)

One thing that strikes me as kind of strange is that, apparently, the web browser on Windows Phone 7 will not support Flash, and apparently will not support Silverlight either! The flash thing is kind of expected, both Apple and Microsoft seem to do everything they can to keep Flash of THEIR devices, but not supporting Silverlight (on an O/S where the entire UI is Silverlight) was a surprise … at first. Then I realized that if the browser supported Silverlight there would be a way for developers to circumvent all of the application approval and marketplace restrictions that I talked about earlier!

Another surprise was that, like all versions of the iPhone until iOS 4.0, Windows Phone 7 devices will only execute a single user application at a time. This is one of the main things that iPhone users have complained about through the versions, and Apple just learned the lesson, but it seems that Microsoft have decided not to. For developers this means that it is imperative that applications save their data and state frequently, because the application could be terminated (with notification and the ability to clean up of course) at any time.

One thing is for sure … Microsoft seem to be betting the company on “The Cloud”, and Windows Phone 7 falls straight into this larger scale objective. The vision is that this new device will be a gateway to The Cloud in the palm of your hand. It is expected that many applications may execute directly from The Cloud (rather than being installed locally on the device) and that the device will have the ability to store (and synchronize) data in The Cloud. Apparently these features will be included for free, with a limited (not announced) amount of on-line storage, and presumably fee-based options for increasing the amount of storage available. Of course using things in The Cloud is all well and good, until youfind yourself in a "roaming" situation, paying $20/MB, or more!

On the bright side, Windows Phone 7 devices will be available from a number of different manufacturers, so there will be choice and competition in the marketplace. Windows Phone 7 devices will (in the US at least) be available from a number of cell phone carriers, unlike Apples exclusive deal with AT&T.

While there is no doubt that Windows Phone 7 promises to be a seriously cool new device, and I have no doubt will sell in larger numbers than any of the predecessor Windows Mobile devices ever did, it remains to be seen whether it will have what it takes to be a serious competitor to the mighty iPhone. I can’t help wishing that Microsoft had done at least some things a little bit differently.


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