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All Selective

By Richard Morris, Posted on May 29, 2015 at 8:39 am

During DevPartner 2015 a number of people ran through the Utilizing the Repository tutorial which sets out to demonstrate how the meta-data stored in the repository describing your Synergy database can be utilized when building a modern Windows Presentation Foundation desktop application using Synergy and the Symphony Framework.

Using your repository, CodeGen and the associated Symphony Framework templates you can build, from the ground up, a complete WPF application, and this is exactly what you do during the tutorial.

Using the Model-View-View Model pattern you code-generate the model elements as repository based data objects that extend the base Symphony Framework DataObjectBase – this provides field level properties with validation and data bindings. Then we code generate the view – the UI element the user interacts with. The view comprises of windows containing the individual edit controls which in turn use code generated styles. These styles define the visual attributes and data bindings of each field in the repository.

Great – you would think. But I’ve been asked about a default behaviour of a WPF application a number of times and again at the conference, and that is the fact that edit controls, specifically text boxes, don’t auto-select all content when they receive focus. I also find it frustrating but thus far have been unable to think of a solution. “It’s a deal breaker” according to Gayle – who’d just completed the tutorial. Well considering Gayle is a rather fine chap I guess it’s time for me to look at the problem again. I spoke with Jeff @ Synergex who pointed me to a blog by Oliver Lohmann which addresses just this problem.

The solution is to register a behaviour against the TextBox control and handle the GotFocus event – and in the event handler force the selection of the data in the TextBox control. Simple!

And simple it was – and it usually is when you are looking for that “complex” answer. I’ve not done much with behaviours so far, but I think that is about to change! The Symphony Framework has been updated (did that on the plane home) and I’ll be releasing that to GuGet very shortly. The Symphony Framework “style” template will be updated – it’s now released as part of CodeGen – to reflect the new capabilities and normal “behaviour” will be resumed.


Learning REST Basics

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 23, 2015 at 1:48 pm

One of the sessions that I presented at the recent DevPartner Conference was on the subject of building RESTful web services using ServiceStack. The basic concepts of REST are often difficult to grasp when you’re first getting started, but while browsing this morning I came across a web site that I thought was a great REST resource, and in particular included a video that I thought did a really nice job of explaining the basic concepts of REST.

The site is http://www.restapitutorial.com/ and the video can be found at http://www.restapitutorial.com/lessons/whatisrest.html


Synergy .NET Platform Targeting Options

By Steve Ives, Posted on May 21, 2015 at 10:25 am

One of the many options that is available to developers each time they create a new project in Visual Studio is how to configure the platform targeting options in the project properties dialogs Build panel. In the latest versions of Synergy there’s probably not much to worry about because the default values probably do exactly what you want most of the time, but the default values were not the same in some older versions of Synergy .NET, so it’s a good idea to have a good understanding of what your options are, and what the implication of choosing each option is.

In Synergy 10.3.1a we’re talking about two options; the Platform target drop-down and the Prefer 32-bit checkbox.

Project Build Options

The Platform target drop-down allows you to select from three different ways that the assembly that is created by your project (the .DLL or .EXE file) can be created; essentially you are choosing which .NET CLR (and Framework) will be used to execute your code. The options are:

Any CPU (default) Assembly can be executed by either the 64-bit or 32-bit CLR, with 64-bit preferred.
x86 Assembly can ONLY be executed by the 32-bit CLR on an Intel x86 CPU.
x64 Assembly can ONLY be executed by the 64-bit CLR on an Intel x64 CPU.

It is important to understand that we’re not talking about which Synergy runtime components will be used, we’re talking about which .NET CLR will be used, and the matching Synergy runtime components must be present on the system in order for the assemblies to be used.

The Prefer 32-bit checkbox (which was added in Synergy 10.3.1a and is only available when the platform target is set to Any CPU) provides the ability for you to determine that even though your assembly will support both 32-bit and 64-bit environments, you would prefer that it executes as 32-bit if a 32-bit environment is available.

The chart below summarizes which environment (32-bit or 64-bit) will be selected for all possible combinations of platform targeting settings and deployment platform.

Framework Selection Grid

A red n/a entry in the table indicates that an assembly would not be available for use in that particular environment.

So what’s the take-away from all of this? Well it’s pretty simple; Stick to the defaults unless you have a good reason to do so. The current default is Any CPU, Prefer 32-bit which means that on Intel x86 and x64 systems your apps will run as 32-bit. This in turn means that you only need to install the 32-bit version of Synergy on runtime only systems unless you also need to run services such as license sever, xfServer, xfServerPlus or SQL OpenNET on the same system. Development systems should ALWAYS have 32-bit and 64-bit Synergy installed.


DevPartner 2015 – WOW!

By Richard Morris, Posted on May 15, 2015 at 6:37 pm

That was the week that was the DevPartner 2015 conference in Philadelphia. Ok, so I’m biased but I really have to say this was one of the best conference weeks I’ve had the pleasure to be part of for many years. There were some really great sessions: The HBS customer demonstration rocked! They came to a conference a couple of years ago, did a tutorial on xfServerPlus and with this new found knowledge (and some PSG guidance) created a cool web bolt-on to their existing Synergy app.

We saw some fresh new faces from Synergex: Marty blasted through the Workbench and visual Studio development environments we provide and showed some really great tools and techniques. Phil gave us a 101 introduction to many of the “must know” features and capabilities of Synergy SDBMS – and of course was able to address mine and Jeff’s performance issues – you had to be there:). Roger demonstrated his wizardry to enlighten everyone as to the issues you need to consider when transferring your data within local and wide area networks – I was the bad router!

Bill Mooney set the whole tone of the conference with a great opening presentation showing just how committed Synergex are to empowering our customers with the best software development capabilities available.

My first day’s session followed and gave me the opportunity to demonstrate how you actually can bring all our great tools together to create true single-source, cross-platform applications which run on platforms as diverse as OpenVMS, UNIX and Microsoft Windows and onto a Sony watch running Google Wear!

Steve Ives went 3D holographic with videos from his recent trip to the Microsoft Build conference that showed just how amazing the Microsoft platform is becoming – and we aim to continue to be a first class player in that arena.

So many of our products are reaching a level of maturity that blows the competition away. Gary Hoffman from TechAnalysts presented a session showing how to use CodeGen and Symphony in the real world and showed just what you can achieve today in Synergy.

Jeff Greene (Senior .NET engineer @ Synergex) and I presented a rather informal (read written the night before) presentation showing the performance and analysis tools in Visual Studio 2015 that you can use to identify problem area and memory leaks in your application. Within minutes Brad from Automated System forwarded me an email he’d just sent to his team:

“At the Synergex conference just this morning, they just showed fantastic new diagnostics tools in Visual Studio 2015.  I just put the Team on the trail of potential memory issues with these new tools in a Virtual PC environment so we don’t alter our current developer stations. This could both reduce the memory footprint and improve performance.” – You can’t beat such instant feedback!

The tutorial time gives attendees the opportunity to play with the latest tools on a pre-configured virtual machine – plug in and code! And we continued the hands-on theme with Friday’s post conference workshop – where we built the DevPartner 2015 App from the ground up!

nexus_working

Thanks to everyone for coming and making the conference such a great success. It’s our 30th conference next year so keep your eyes and ears open for dates and details – it will be a conference not to miss!


Cross-platform development with Visual Studio

By Roger Andrews, Posted on May 12, 2015 at 12:16 pm

Updated July 20, 2015

We’ve long fostered a close relationship with Microsoft through their VSIP program, which has enabled us to pioneer many aspects of language integration with Visual Studio. We have pushed the envelope in this area farther than any other non-Microsoft language, and Microsoft continues to be a strategic partner, helping us provide a first-class experience for the Synergy DBL language in Visual Studio. Synergy/DE itself is written in C/C++, and we use Visual Studio Projects internally to develop and build the majority of our product set.

With the release of Visual Studio 2015, we published an article summarizing our history with Visual Studio and showing how we leverage the latest Microsoft tools to enhance our cross-platform core technologies and port to new platforms. We are delighted that Microsoft picked up this article and blogged about it in the VC++ blog. It’s a chapter in our cross-platform history that spans a number of years and includes some of the most interesting development challenges we’ve ever tackled. The article also discusses some issues (particularly with debugging) that we are still working with Microsoft to resolve.

Read the full article here.

 


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