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I’m baaack…

By Don Fillion, Posted on August 27, 2009 at 4:28 pm

 

A few of you may remember me from my days with various software companies, where for many years I developed vertical market software. We may have rubbed elbows at an SPC, or met more recently while I was a Synergex PSG Consultant. After a really quick year or so in that role, I have now moved into a managerial position with Synergex, so, this is now Don Fillion, Director of Professional Services, kicking off PSG’s contribution to the blogosphere, the Synergy/DE PSG Blog!

As you are probably aware, we have some pretty fine consultants in the Professional Services Group: masters at working with customers to apply the technology Synergex develops. This blog is really their forum, a place for them to expound on their thoughts concerning software application development in the land of Synergy/DE (and beyond…!)—and hopefully pass along some insight gained during their various engagements. But it’s your place too, as we hope posts will engender some lively discussion.

So, welcome! If you have ideas or suggestions about future posts, or you would just like to discuss the latest technology trends and how they impact you, please feel free to email me at don.fillion@synergex.com. I look forward to working with you!

Don Fillion

PS… As I was researching weblogs, I came across some pretty cool sites. One of the best was LIFEHACKER – tips and downloads for getting things done. It’s kind of a toolbox and discussion forum for modern (techie) life. Check it out!
 


Preventing performance issues related to antivirus software

By Roger Andrews, Posted on August 10, 2009 at 7:19 pm

We get quite a number of support calls with either performance or system-down issues related to installation security suites, mostly related to antivirus software. In most cases the culprit ends up being the incorrect setup of the antivirus software.

Let’s first consider what antivirus software has to do and how it ships by default.

In today’s cat and mouse game, the security software vendors are trying to keep up with all of the malware generators that pop up daily. A typical antivirus signature file contains over 80 Mb of compressed signatures, and  the major players like Trend, McAphee, Symantec, VIPRE, and Kaspersky provide multiple updates to signatures daily. The problem then is deciding what to scan and when to scan—you obviously don’t want to miss an infected file that’s downloaded between updates to the scan databases, but you also don’t want to bog down your system unnecessarily. By default, most security products scan all files once daily, and use real time scanning to scan infectable files on both read and write. Some even default to continuously scanning all files. Though each vendor has different terminology for “scan on read” and “scan on write” (in fact some confuse read as write and write as read), “scan on read” effectively means scan every time a file is opened and “scan on write” effectively means only scan when a file opened for write is closed. Some vendors even have a flag to scan all files on close. And some products, like VIPRE, don’t have any concept of scan on write only.

Now that we know how these products handle file access, let’s consider some scenarios on live systems.

Scenario 1 – When “scan all files” is set

In this scenario, every file may be scanned for a virus on open and close, regardless of writeability. Consider scanning a .vhd for a virtual image, or a Synergy DBMS file every time a user opens or closes the file. (Both file types are usually opened even for write.) The same would even apply to every file accessed in your SQL Server and Oracle databases, and to all of your Synergy .dbr and .elb files.  The implications to your system performance are obvious.

Scenario 2 – Scan only infectable files

In this scenario, infectable files may be scanned on open and close. By default in most vendors’ products, this includes Synergy .ism files as well as .vhd files.  This scenario as well has a significant impact on your system performance due to the overhead of scanning large files.

Scenario 3 – Scan only infectable files on Write

In this case, .exe and .dll files are only scanned when updated, but a .vhd and a Synergy .ISM file would also be scanned on close because they are usually opened for write. This technique might be good for a general purpose file server of Word documents, for example, but not for a data server.

As you can see, without some degree of tuning, virus scanning products can have disastrous effects on system performance.  (You can use the Sysinternals Process Monitor to see the overhead your virus scanning tool is causing.)

For obvious reasons, scanning of files takes place at a high priority in the kernel mode of the operating system. This usually impacts both system time and user processing time. Additionally, many vendors now use the VISTA filter manager, and I previously bloggedabout the performance penalties of such hooking on Vista and Server 2008. Luckily the overhead is significantly reduced in Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7.

In our recent internal use of Microsoft’s SharePoint server, we were seeing dramatic performance problems when installing and uninstalling software, and even when the IIS SharePoint services (which are .NET-based) were loading and jitting. By correctly disabling the “scan on open for read” options, the performance significantly improved. We also tried the VIPRE product, and this improved performance even further – however, for a very specific reason. VIPRE, as stated previously, scans all files on open and close, and gains its performance edge because it recognizes signed, read-only EXE/DLL files and caches them if they have not changed so that the re-scan is not required. This is what gives it a seemingly large performance gain. However, once you throw in files that are not signed, its scan requires significantly more resources because you can’t disable the “scan on read” functionality (which would require a scan of such products as Diskeeper moving around files). Additionally, VIPRE also scans (but does not report issues with) other excluded files, so the overhead is pretty much permanent for unversioned files like Synergy DBMS files.

The key is, after you have a clean full-file scan on a system, set scan on write only, scan infectable files, and make sure that the file extensions of your databases and VHD files are set to no scan. And, due to its inability to scan on read, we do not recommend VIPRE for use with Synergy/DE installations.

(Of course I’m providing this information for information purposes only, and it is up to each company to set its security policies.)


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