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SPC Boston comes to a close

By William Mooney, Posted on May 28, 2009 at 6:55 pm

We just wrapped up the SPC in Boston and it went great. Customers seemed to really like the ChronoTrack demo app (and all that sample code to take home!) and the Code Phantom‘s challenge was answered by nearly all of the attendees – in fact, many stayed late just to make sure they’d completed it. (We kept them energized with pizza and beer, of course.)  I received lots of positive comments from customers about the conference and Synergy/DE in general. One customer mentioned that he had written us off 10 years ago but is absolutely amazed at how far we have come and what can be done with Synergy/DE. Another customer at one of the lunches referenced how much he had learned about what is possible with Synergy/DE that he hadn’t known about because he’d been “heads-down” for so long with his current project. Overall, customers were really pleased about learning what they can do right now with their existing Synergy/DE-based applications to make them more powerful.

We were also joined by Bigbah and his team (MannyJodah, and Mark), who seemed to really enjoy the conference – at least according to their Facebook pages!

It was a really informative conference and a great time was had by all. We’re looking forward to seeing our friends “across the pond” in a couple of weeks.


Protecting the Spread of Security Infections in Places You Might Not Think About

By Roger Andrews, Posted on May 6, 2009 at 10:20 pm

Several weeks ago we had a new Ikon color printer installed. It has a separate Kodak PC running the printer drivers and color matching software. I noticed that it was Internet connected and that software updates were not being applied.

When we contacted the manufacturer, we were told the PC was an embedded XP device and did not need the XP SP3 nor the security patches. We immediately disabled the Internet connection (embedded XP devices are susceptible to viruses too)—but that’s not really good enough. To date the manufacturer still has not authorized XP SP3 nor the regular monthly security patches, yet all printed documents go through this machine and users can go to the console and copy documents from a USB drive or internal network locations. Once infected with a virus or worm — or even a botnet — we’re SOL, because the manufacturer of the device doesn’t support installing anti-virus software, and any such changes would require an engineer to reload the system from scratch.

The problems are not just with Microsoft. Adobe has had to patch its Flash Player and Reader already this year, and another Reader patch is due. How many of us keep the Adobe Reader and Flash players up to date?

Why is this such a big issue? Well, the problem is that these embedded XP systems can get infected. One example is the Conficker worm. In most cases Conficker is benign until it is woken up by its creators. Users don’t even know they have it, may not even have Internet access (or may not know that they do), and/or may have been infected internally. The only way to detect these kinds of issues other than with a virus scanner is to look at network traffic going back to “phone home.” I think an article from the San Jose Mercury News illustrates the problem well. Even if you have a patch available to avoid infecting a machine, what if every patch and/or daily antivirus update required a 90-day approval process?

My recommendation is that you get with the manufacturers of all embedded XP devices that are connected to your network and get the regular updates and XP SP3, and ensure that Internet Explorer is disabled in such a way that the machine’s users cannot re-enable it. And also be sure to keep your Adobe Reader, Flash players, and similar products up-to-date.


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